Jenna Jameson Says She Gained 20 Lbs. After Taking a Break from Keto to ‘Live My Best Carby Life’ – PEOPLE Great Ideas

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Research Reveals Keto Diet Could Help Fight the Flu – Maxim


Turns out cutting carbs could boost your immune system’s ability to fight the virus.

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Keto diets work. That is, if you follow the rules even loosely, you will lose weight. Whether a diet focused heavily on fats and proteins and lacking in carbs is good for you long-term or not, however, is a subject of much debate

The arguments for keto have another boost, though, in research from Yale University that appears to indicate a high-fat, low-carb diet has the potential to help you fight the flu. 

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Let’s be clear: It’s not smart to mess with influenza. People should just get the vaccine. But every year plenty of people wait a little too long to get it, or they catch a flu bug not covered by the shot. In their study published in Science Immunology, Yale researchers revealed that through research with flu-infected mice they put on a keto diet they discovered that the keto mice simply had a better survival rate than the mice on a regular diet.

A Yale blog post published after the study was released in mid-November elaborated:

The ketogenic diet — which for people includes meat, fish, poultry, and non-starchy vegetables — activates a subset of T cells in the lungs not previously associated with the immune system’s response to influenza, enhancing mucus production from airway cells that can effectively trap the virus, the researchers report.

“This was a totally unexpected finding,” said co-senior author Akiko Iwasaki, the Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Immunobiology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, and an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

A byproduct of keto’s effect on the body appears to trigger an extra immune-boosting response, then, kind of an extra boost to the systems that fall in place when the body’s normal defenses come into play.

The research project that discovered the keto effect on flu sufferers came about after a pair of trainee scientists noted that the immune system could produce damaging “inflammasomes,” which are harmful because they can cause the body’s bug-fighting defenses to kick into overdrive, overwhelming the organs and possibly killing the patient. 

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Someone noticed that diets consisting of meat, fish, poultry, and non-starchy vegetables tended to block inflammasomes. So they went to work on their unfortunate mice—and discovered the happy carb-consuming rodents were less likely to develop the mucous that can coat the lungs and isolate the body from influenza’s onslaught. 

Co-senior study author Vishwa Deep Dixit concluded, “This study shows that the way the body burns fat to produce ketone bodies from the food we eat can fuel the immune system to fight flu infection.” 

Chalk one up for keto this time, then. But seriously, don’t rely on diet. Get the shot, no matter what. 

Keto Diet Grocery Shopping List for Beginners – Shape Magazine

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15 Best Keto Products Of 2019, According to a Nutritionist – Women’s Health

Somehow 2020 is only weeks away, and if there is one diet trend that totally dominated the past year (and the year before it), it’s keto. You tried it, three of your coworkers tried it, heck, even your dog tried it. (Jk…please don’t put your dog on a high-fat diet.)

While on your keto-neato journey, you’ve probably searched high and low for the best keto products out there. After all, since the keto diet hit what Google calls “peak popularity” in January 2019, the market for packaged keto-friendly foods has totally exploded, making it difficult to spot the diff between a product that’s good for you and one that’s, well, not.

When you’re trying to lose weight, you ultimately need to look beyond the keto label, says Alyssa Koens, lead registered dietitian with Profile Sanford (a company that, btw, sells its own line of clean keto-friendly frozen meals). That’s because something that says it’s high in protein could also be high in unhealthy trans fats, while something that claims to be low-carb could secretly be loaded with tons of unnecessary sugar or sodium. (Bummer, I know.)

It’s also worth noting that “the keto diet can vary pretty widely, with some people doing the traditional high-fat, no-carb version, and others doing the more popular, modified plan, where you can have some carbs,” Koens says. Either way, she says, you’re going to want to fill your shopping cart with three kinds of food: nutrient-dense fruits and veggies (think berries and non-starchy vegetables like kale, broccoli, or spinach); quality lean protein sources like fish, beef, and eggs; and healthy-fats, like the omega-3s found in nuts and olive oil.

Now, what to avoid when it comes to packaged foods? Hidden sugars, high sodium levels, and trans or saturated fats (and of course, artificial ingredients).

“I always tell clients not to just look at the front of the box, but to turn it around and check the nutrition facts panel,” Koens says. Any keto product you buy should contain mono- or polyunsaturated fats, less than 4 grams of sugar per serving, and equal less than 10 to 20 percent of your daily value of sodium.

So, now that you’re armed with all the info you need to make smart choices at the grocery (or your favorite online supermarket), here are the 15 best keto products to shop now:

People Who Shouldn’t Do Keto: 6 Types of People the Keto Diet May Be Bad For – Parade

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It might seem like everyone (EVERYONE!) is giving the ketogenic diet a try. So should you hop on the ultralow carb bandwagon? Not necessarily.

Sure, a few small studies have found that keto diets can help with weight loss in the short term. But for certain people, going low-carb and high-fat could end up doing more harm than good. Here’s a look at six groups who should probably steer clear. 

People Who Shouldn’t Do Keto

1. Pregnant women

Experts agree that pregnancy isn’t the time to try to lose weight. (After all, you’re growing a human!) Especially by following the keto diet. Why? Cutting out entire food groups make it super hard to get all the nutrients that are essential for a healthy pregnant, explains nutrition expert Frances Largeman-Roth, RDN, author of Feed the Belly.  “Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains provide necessary nutrients for a growing baby, including folate, B vitamins, and choline,” she says. If you’re concerned about gaining too much weight during pregnancy, talk with your doctor. She can help you put together a healthy eating plan that will cover all your nutritional bases. 

Related: The Whole30 vs. Keto Face-Off—Which Low-Carb Diet Is Better for Losing Weight?

2. Breastfeeding women

Breastfeeding also isn’t a healthy time to attempt to lose weight. Breastfeeding women actually need more calories than pregnant women—and cutting your intake could hurt your milk supply, Largeman-Roth says. Your water needs tend to be greater while breastfeeding too. (Experts recommend downing a glass of water each time you nurse, FYI.) And since the keto diet cuts out water-rich foods like fruits and some veggies, you could be at higher risk for getting dehydrated, says Largeman-Roth.  

3. People with digestive disorders

Diets that are low in carbs also tend to be low in fiber. But if you deal with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or chronic constipation, getting enough roughage can be key for keeping you regular, according to the National Institutes of Health. (Most people need 25-35 g fiber daily, but a registered dietician can help you figure out the right amount for your digestive issue.) That’s not all. “Adequate fiber is also important for the health of the gut microbiome,” says nutrition expert Martha McKittrick, RD. “A concern of the keto diet is that the low fiber and high fat content might have a negative effect on the microbiome.”

Related: 6 Tips to Avoid the Keto Flu and Other Icky Side Effects of the Keto Diet

4. People at high risk for osteoporosis

If bone health is a concern for you, there’s some evidence to suggest that a ketogenic diet might not be a good fit. Recent animal studies have found bone mineral loss in mice and rats that are fed ketogenic diets. Children who follow keto diets for epilepsy have also been shown to have poorer bone health, findings show. Experts don’t fully understand why, but in the meantime, it might make sense to err on the side of caution. “We don’t know enough about long-term use of the keto diet and bone health,” McKittrick says. “Personally, I’d be careful if you’re at risk for osteoporosis. 

5. People with a history of yo-yo dieting

Extreme diets like the keto diet are notoriously tough to stick with. “They aren’t easy to follow and they don’t teach people how to eat a balanced and varied diet,” Largeman-Roth says. So if you’ve crash dieted and regained lost weight in the past, trying to break up with carbs might not be the best move for long-term success. “You could use keto as a way to kick off weight loss and then transition to a more reasonable healthy eating plan,” she suggests. “But I would advise someone to try a more moderate approach first.”

6. People with diabetes (maybe)

If you take insulin to manage your diabetes, cutting your carbs superlow could lead to dangerously low blood sugar levels. “If you’re not providing the body with enough carbohydrates, as with the keto diet, and then you’re taking insulin to bring glucose into the body’s cells, there won’t be much circulating in the bloodstream,” Largeman-Roth says. 

That doesn’t mean a keto diet is always off limits if you have diabetes. Indeed, some studies have found that very low carb diets could potentially be helpful for those with type 2. The key is talking with your healthcare provider first to figure out what’s right for you. “You’d need to be under a doctor’s supervision to go keto if you’re diabetic,” Largeman-Roth says. “And a registered dietician nutritionist could help design an eating plan to support you.” 

Find out if experts recommend intuitive eating for people with diabetes.

Co-Op Sauce launches keto-friendly hot sauces – Food Business News

CHICAGO – Specialty hot sauce company Co-Op Sauce is launching its core line of five hot sauces with keto-friendly recipes made with zero sugar.

The wild-fermented sauces start with probiotic bases and non-G.M.O. produce from small farms in Illinois and Michigan. Each variety is keto-friendly, vegan, gluten-free and allergen-free. Flavors include The Barrel, Carrot Habanero, ChChCherry Bomb, Chi-Racha and Jalapeño Lime.

The Barrel sauce is a classic, all-purpose sauce with a 2 out of 6 heat rating, Co-Op Sauce said. The sauce, which features fermented Japonais and Anaheim peppers, is aged in a Koval Whiskey barrel and finished with Dark Matter roasted Harrar and Nicaragua coffee.

The Carrot Habanero Sauce has a 4 out of 6 heat rating and combines carrots, fermented habanero, onion, lime and garlic.

The Chchcherry Bomb sauce, which has a 2 out of 6 heat rating, features chilies served three ways: fresh, fermented and roasted. With a tomato base, the sauce includes fresh morita chilies, fermented chili peppers and roasted red peppers.

The Chi-Racha sauce has a 3 out of 6 heat rating and is made with fermented jalapeño and garlic along with mustard seed and turmeric.

The Jalapeño Lime sauce, made with fermented jalapeño peppers, has a 2 out of 6 heat rating.

“We are excited to make our ‘OG’ sauces with new sugar-free formulations for longtime fans and to introduce new converts to our small-batch, wild-fermented style of hot sauce,” said Mike Bancroft, founder of Co-Op Sauce. “We work with local farmers to source premium chili peppers and other ingredients to make culinarily inspired sauces that bring much more than just heat to whatever you put them on. They’re built for flavor, not for pain.”

The new Co-Op Sauce hot sauces retail for $4.99 per 5-oz bottle.

List of Keto Fruit That’s Low In Sugar – Shape Magazine

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List of Keto Fruit That’s Low In Sugar | Shape – Shape Magazine

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Fattitude, new keto-focused restaurant, opens in Boise, ID – boisedev.com

Two years ago, David Cruz nearly died.

“I developed diverticulitis, and I almost died due to inflammation in my gastrointestinal tract,” he said. “I didn’t know a whole lot about nutrition back then.”

The brush with illness led him to a new path – and soon, a new restaurant.

Cruz, his fiancé Desiree Lane and a third partner, Andi White, are opening Fattitude inside the Crunch Fitness gym at Lakeharbor Ln. and State St. in Boise.

The Keto-focused restaurant will build on their existing business, Keto2Go, but add quick-serve and meals to go to an already established offering of pre-packaged ketogenic meals.

The ketogenic diet eliminates most carbohydrates from bread and sugar and replaces the calories with foods that contain more fats and proteins.

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“We’ve been doing the meal prep for a while,” Cruz said. “The new location will allow us to offer keto and paleo coffees and pastries. We make amazing donuts, cheesecakes, brownies, cupcakes, cookies. We do unhealthy concepts like pizza, lasagna, meatloaf – and we make them very very healthy.”

Both Lane and White are chefs, and worked together to create a menu that applies ketogenic principles to common foods.

“For instance, with pizza, you might have seen cauliflower pizzas. Our style is to make make it with almond flour,” Cruz said. “It has a different texture and taste that I think is delicious.”

The business started by utilizing a shared kitchen at Food Services of America, but they had limited access which meant they could only provide so much product.

“The demand is so hight now we need not only more space, but more days cooking int he kitchen to be able to provide all of our customers the meal prep side,” Cruz said.

Fattitude will bring together meal prep, the coffee shop-style offerings and grab-and-go dinners. Cruz said he hopes to have a grand opening around December 15th – just before the new year’s resolution crush.

“We want to get the word out: food is medicine and fat is your friend.”

The ketogenic diet may help fight against the flu – Big Think

  • The ketogenic diet works by tricking your body into thinking its in starvation mode — with very few carbohydrates to turn into glucose, your body instead burns fat to use as energy.
  • While most go on the diet to lose weight, evidence suggests a whole host of additional benefits to mental and physical health, though these findings still need to be confirmed.
  • Recent research has added another potential benefit to the keto diet: It could help you defend against flu infections.

The low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diet might not just be good for your waistline; it could also keep you healthy this flu season. Yale University researchers discovered that mice who were fed a ketogenic diet were better at fighting off flu infections that those fed a high-carb diet instead.

How does the keto diet work?

People can use the keto diet to quickly lose weight by capitalizing on a metabolic state called ketosis. Normally, the human body gets most of its energy from glucose (i.e., blood sugar) derived from carbohydrates, but the body doesn’t have a good way of storing glucose. Because of this, the humans need an alternative energy source to get them through periods when they can’t get access to any food. Once the body is deprived of glucose, the liver begins to break down fat into an alternative energy source called ketones that can keep the body going long after it last ate.

Luckily, we can jump into this metabolic state without having to actually starve ourselves by simply eating no or very little carbohydrates — eating more fats and proteins keeps us feeling full while our bodies still burn fat to make ketones.

Interestingly, the keto diet seems to have a lot more effects other than weight loss. Ketosis appears to have wide-ranging effects throughout the body, with potential beneficial outcomes for diabetics and epileptics. There’s also some evidence suggesting a correlation between the keto diet and improved mental health and better outcomes in cancer treatments — though the research is still far from conclusive.

Now, it appears that the keto diet could offer another benefit: an improved defense against the flu. Researchers administered a lethal dose of the influenza A virus to two groups of mice: one group that was fed a keto diet and another that was fed a more standard diet. The keto mice consistently survived and fared better overall.

A thinner waistline and a stronger immune system

The researchers discovered that a keto diet appeared to activate genes that produce a specialized type of immune cells called gamma delta T cells. Tissue samples from the lungs of mice in the keto group confirmed that they had higher levels of these cells. The researchers suspected that these elevated levels of gamma delta T cells killed infected cells in the mice’s lungs, and they also appeared to increase mucus production in the lungs, helping to trap more of the virus.

Furthermore, when the researchers fed a keto diet to mice specially bred to lack the genes that code for gamma delta T cells, the diet had no effect on their survivability, confirming that ketosis was somehow upregulating these genes.

Further experiments confirmed that ketosis itself, rather than just a low-carb diet, seemed to be the triggering factor. The researchers fed some mice a high-fat diet with less carbs than the standard diet but more than the keto one. Specifically, the keto diet contained less than 1 percent carbs, the standard diet contained 58 percent carbs, and the high-fat, high-carb diet contained 20 percent carbs. While the high-fat, high-carb diet did elevate gamma delta T cell levels, it did not appear to do so to the degree where any benefit could be gained.

Remember to take your bacon-avocado omelet with a grain of salt

While this exciting finding does suggest that the keto diet may help you power through flu season, it’s important to remain realistic. For one, this study was conducted on mice, not humans. Animals respond differently to both treatments and diseases than humans do, and some researchers have found that animal trials tend to be conducted under different circumstances than human trials and can be less rigorous as well, sometimes resulting in biased findings.

What’s more, the keto diet may come with many health benefits, but its also not without its risks. The high meat component of the keto diet can damage your kidneys and cause gout, and the diet’s restrictive nature can lead to vitamin deficiencies. It ought not need to be said, but pregnant women and young children shouldn’t be put on the keto diet — the diet tricks your body into thinking it’s starving, which is not ideal for development.

Ironically, quickly switching from your normal diet to a keto one can actually give you flu-like symptoms. The “keto flu” is a temporary side effect of rapidly removing carbs from your diet that can cause nausea, headaches, weakness, issues with concentration, and other symptoms. Hardly ideal if you’re trying to stay ahead of the flu bug!

Fortunately, most of these negative effects can be mitigated or avoided by building a healthy keto meal plan and transitioning gradually into a keto diet. Undertaking any diet with the goal of improving your health will require doing some homework to figure out what works, and the keto diet is no exception. It’s also important to remember that the keto diet probably works best as a short-term diet. Few people can stick with the diet over the long term, so hard evidence on its long-term impacts is scant, but it’s unlikely that excluding healthy components of a normal diet (like fruit) would be sustainable. That being said, if these findings are verified, then it might not be a bad idea to try the keto diet once flu season rears its ugly head once again.

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