Keto Christmas Cookies Are a Holiday Miracle – Chowhound

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Keto Christmas cookies might sound like an impossible holiday miracle, but they do exist. And the keto diet has become so mainstream, we wouldn’t be surprised if Santa himself were tempted to try it. Luckily, these keto cookies would all be welcome on his—or anyone else’s—holiday dessert plate.

Keto Cornerstones

The things everyone seems to know about keto are that it is high in fat (which means you can still enjoy holly jolly holiday feasts of bacon-wrapped prime rib), and that it’s low in carbs (which seems like it would knock cookies right out of the equation). But with the right substitutions, you can still enjoy sweets.

Related Reading: Keto-Friendly Low-Sugar & Sugar-Free Cookbooks

Keto-izing desserts and junk food on the regular is perhaps not the best way to stick to the spirit or the letter of the keto lifestyle, but it is a great way to get a taste of holiday spirit without totally wrecking your diet.

Keto Baking Essentials: Flour & Sugar Substitutes

what is almond flour? it is keto and gluten-free?

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Butter and eggs are A-OK per keto guidelines, but flour and sugar need to be swapped out.

Alternative flours are easy (almond flour is everywhere, including in giant bags at Costco, and coconut flour is sure to be in stock at Whole Foods), but sugar is a bigger stumbling block.

Erythritol-plum fairies just doesn’t have the same ring to it, but in cookies and other baked goods, keto-friendly sugar substitutes like this are a necessity.

Related Reading: The Best Zero-Calorie Sweetener We’ve Tried So Far

Stevia, xylitol, and monkfruit are some other sugar substitutes you’ll see in these keto cookie recipes, so be sure to read them beforehand and make sure you have all the ingredients you’ll need.

If you want to get into keto cakes and savory keto baked goods, you’d do well to check out keto cookbooks and online blogs.

Keto Cookie Recipes

Try these on for size, and be sure to save some for Santa.

Keto Chocolate Chip Cookies

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CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES!!! 🍪 Keto chocolate chip cookies are one of my favourite keto cookies. Make them for keto workplace treats, a sneaky treat for yourself, or a sneaky healthy treat for the kids. Ingredients and instructions below👇🏼 check out the link in my bio for the full method and metric conversions. #fatforweightloss⁠ .⁠ Ingredients:⁠ 3.5 oz Salted Butter (3.5 oz – 1/2 cup)⁠ 4.5 oz Erythritol (SoNourished) (4.5 oz – 3/4 cup)⁠ 1 tsp Vanilla Extract⁠ 1 large Egg (50g / 1.7 oz)⁠ 6 oz Almond Flour (6 oz – 1 1/2 cups)⁠ 1/2 tsp baking powder⁠ 1/2 tsp xanthan gum (optional)⁠ 1/4 tsp Salt⁠ 3 oz Sugar Free Chocolate Chips (30g – 3/4 cup)⁠ .⁠ Instructions:⁠ 1. Preheat the oven to 180 C (355 F). Microwave the butter for 30 seconds to melt, but make sure it is not hot.⁠ 2. Place the butter and erythritol in a mixing bowl and beat until combined. Add the vanilla and egg, and beat on low for another 15 seconds exactly.⁠ 3. Add the almond flour, baking powder, xanthan gum and salt. Beat until well combined.⁠ 4. Press the dough together and remove from the bowl. Knead in the chocolate chips with your hands.⁠ 5. Divide and shape the dough into 12 balls (or use a small ice cream scoop) and place on a baking tray. Bake for 10 minutes.⁠ 7. Allow to cool before serving. Keep in an airtight container for up to 7 days.⁠ .⁠ 🌟 Did you make these cookies? Tag me so I can see and for a chance to be featured!⁠ .⁠ .⁠ .⁠ ⁠⁠#ketotransformation #ketodiet #ketoweightloss #lowcarb #ketocommunity #ketogirl #ketomealprep #lowcarblife #intermittentfasting #ketosis #beforeandafter #weightloss #ketofamily #ketoresults #jzeats #weightlosscommunity #weightlossgoals #fatloss #weightlossmotivation #weightlossinspiration #eatclean #instahealth #weightlossprogress #weightlossdiary #ketodesserts #chocolatechipcookies #keto⁠ #dessertsofinstagram #instagramdesserts⁠ ⁠

A post shared by Aaron Day, NT, CWP, SENA (@fatforweightloss) on Aug 24, 2019 at 6:55am PDT

You may play around with different cookie types every year, but chocolate chip cookies are a non-negotiable part of the holiday cookie plate. This keto version of the classic uses almond flour, erythritol, and sugar-free chocolate chips. The xantham gum helps bind the dough. Get the Keto Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe.

Keto Sugar Cookies

The other (and perhaps the primary) holiday cookie all-star is the sugar cookie, with its cheerful shapes and festive colors. In making it keto-friendly, not only do you have to deal with the dough, but the sugar-based royal icing. This recipe uses two specific sweeteners and two types of flour to achieve the best effect. So break out those cookie cutters and get the pin rolling. Get the Keto Sugar Cookie recipe.

Keto Gingerbread Men

Prefer less sweet icing and more warmly spiced cookie, but still want the squee-inducing shapes? Keto gingerbread men are here for you, and these are baked twice (just like biscotti!) to achieve a perfect crisp bite (though if you prefer soft and chewy ginger cookies and don’t like fussing with cutters, try this keto ginger cookie recipe). Get the Keto Gingerbread Men recipe.

Keto Thumbprint Cookies

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Kicking off cookie season with our favorite holiday cookies. Thumbprint Jam Cookies updated from the archives to now include options for paleo, low carb & dairy-free🥰🍪🎄 .It’s a cold one today so just staying indoors & catching up on some 💻work today & hoping to get the rest of my holiday shopping done🎁❤️ Happy Monday friends, hope it’s a good one💗💗 . . FULL PRINTABLE RECIPE: https://lifemadesweeter.com/shortbread-thumbprint-cookies-7-ways/ . . .INGREDIENTS: FOR THE COOKIES: 1 1/2 cups superfine almond flour (plus more as needed) 1/3 cup softened ghee OR softened refined coconut oil for #vegan 1/3 cup pure maple syrup OR Lakanto sugar-free syrup 1 tsp vanilla extract . .Homemade strawberry chia seed jam or your favorite sugar-free jam (Walden-Farms , Crofters etc) . . In a large bowl, add almond flour, ghee, maple syrup, salt & vanilla & mix until dough is combined. Add more flour as needed if dough seems too soft. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 350F. Remove dough from fridge and form roll into 1-1.5 TBSP-sized dough balls & place about 1.5″ apart on a large (14.5 x 18.5) unlined baking sheet. Make an indentation with thumb or using a 1/4 teaspoon in the center of each dough ball. Bake in preheated oven until set, about 10-11 minutes. Be careful not to overbake, as the cookies will continue cooking as they are cooling. Remove from oven and indent center again if necessary. Allow to cool completely and fill with jam. . . #f52grams #feedfeed #lchfdiet #lowcarbdiet #ketorecipes #keto #glutenfree #sugarfree #lchf #paleorecipes @thefeedfeed #f52cookies @food52 #paleo #keto #glutenfree #thumbprintcookies #shortbreadcookies #lowcarb #f52holidaycookie #christmascookies #ketocookies #kitchn #meatlessmonday #glutenfreerecipes #holidaycookies #cookietray #christmascookiebox #cookiebox #feedfeedbaking

A post shared by Kelly Kwok – GF Recipes (@lifemadesweeter) on Dec 2, 2019 at 1:09pm PST

Easier than linzer cookies but equally charming, thumbprint cookies are perfect for showcasing your favorite sugar-free jam in the center. Heed the recipe tip to not use parchment paper here, as it causes these cookies to spread. Get the Keto Thumbprint Cookie recipe.

Keto Chocolate Shortbread

Are mere chocolate chips in buttery vanilla-scented dough not enough for you? Make these double-chocolate chunk keto shortbread cookies and satisfy your deepest, darkest (chocolate) cravings. Milk most definitely required. Get the Keto Chocolate Shortbread Cookie recipe.

Related Reading: The Best Uses for Non-Dairy Milks Besides Cereal

Keto Macaroons

These keto coconut cookies are perfectly chewy, and work just as well on a Christmas cookie platter as they do in a Hanukkah dessert spread.Get the Keto Macaroon recipe.

Keto Snickerdoodles

Soft, chewy, cinnamony perfection, in just about 30 minutes, and with minimal carbs per serving. Add these to your holiday baking list for sure. Get the Keto Snickerdoodle recipe.

Keto Spritz Cookies

Yes, those delightfully old-fashioned spritz cookies can get a keto makeover too. Dust off the cookie press and prepare for a big batch—cut the recipe in half if you don’t want so many sweets around, or ship some to keto friends and fam who live far away. Get the Keto Spritz Cookie recipe.

Keto Butter Pecan Cookies

Pecan sandy fans, take note: These low-carb butter pecan cookies are an ideal keto stand-in for your old faves. Get the Keto Butter Pecan Cookie recipe.

Keto Snowball Cookies

You know those unassuming little powder sugar-coated cookie lumps that taste so good and melt away just like actual snow on your tongue? Well, you can have a keto rendition of those too! Get the Keto Snowball Cookie recipe.

For more festive tips, tricks, and recipes, visit our Holiday Headquarters.

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NOSH Live Pitch Slam 7: Know Brainer Outsmarts Competition with Keto Marshmallows – NOSH

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The future may be less sweet, but that doesn’t mean it’s any less fun. Ketogenic brand Know Brainer won the NOSH Live Winter 2019 Pitch Slam for MaxMallow, its new line of sugar-free, ketogenic marshmallows.

As in previous years, this edition of Pitch Slam invited brands to pitch their product and field questions from a panel of judges in quick seven-minute rounds. The prize was a $10,000 advertising package.

Pitch Slam competitors included frozen plant-based brand Eat Nice Foods, which produces vegan comfort food like ravioli; Armenian yogurt dip brand Sosi’s Healthy Pleasures; allergen-free salsa and dip brand Zubi’s; CBD chocolate and tincture brand Vital Leaf and upcycled chip brand Pulp Pantry.

Sitting on the judges’ panel was Gail Becker, founder and CEO of Caulipower and Vegolutionary Foods; Pete Speranza, Business Development Principal at 301 Inc.; Katie Paul, VP of Category Management and growth solutions at KeHE Distributors; and David Lafferty, senior global grocery coordinator at Whole Foods Market. The judges evaluated each on product elements such as pack design and ingredient callouts, as well as considering other aspects of the company, such as team building.

“We were looking for category disruptors — things that haven’t been thought of before,” Becker explained. “Things that spoke to you off the shelf. It’s a very crowded store and social world. To capture [an] eye and imagination in 3.2 seconds is a real challenge and incredibly important.”

The judges were in agreement that Know Brainer has done just that. The brand’s marshmallow line launched just this fall and is the first of its kind, founder and CEO Shari Leidich told NOSH. Packaging played a big role in the judges’ deliberations: MaxMallow’s bright, bubbly design features clear callouts for sugar-free and added MCT oil and collagen for healthy fats and protein, Paul said. Taste, of course, played a role too.

“The taste and texture is amazing, and for being zero sugar it stood out to us,” she said.

Know Brainer began in 2016 with organic ketogenic butter creamers and instant drinks — said to boost energy for the brain and body — before launching ‘snackworthy marshmallows’ this fall in Mint Chip, Burnt Caramel, Classic Vanilla, Cinnamon Toast, Golden Milk and Lightning Vanilla, a SKU with added caffeine. The marshmallows work for snacking or as a coffee condiment, she explained. Leidich previously launched raw, sprouted brand Two Moms in the Raw after she was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). In managing her diet, she found healthy fats and protein played a critical role.

Leidich noted in her pitch that sugar-free is one of the fastest growing categories in non-chocolate candies, expected to reach $11 billion by 2020. MaxMallow is already in 100 stores and online and will launch on Amazon in a few weeks; Leidich said the brand is also developing a vegan-friendly SKU as well as a s’mores flavored variety and has seen traction across demographics, from keto consumers to kids.

2019 Processor of the Year: R&D at Hearthside Food Solutions – Food Processing

Processor of the Year

Hearthside Food Solutions cannot name its customers, but it’s been entrusted with some of America’s favorite baked goodies.

By Dave Fusaro, Editor in Chief

This deeper dive into our 2019 Processor of the Year is part of a three part series. You can read about Hearthside’s business here as well as about its Plant Operations in this article.

A couple of sports franchises can lay claim to being “America’s team,” but in the baking world, that title belongs to Hearthside Food Solutions.

With $3 billion in annual sales, almost none of that its own brands, Hearthside is the real baker of some of America’s favorite brands. The company cannot disclose its clients, but public stories have identified Hearthside as a contract manufacturer for Mondelez, General Mills and PepsiCo, among other famous-brand companies. 

“It may sound cliché but all of us are committed to the spirit of innovation, continuous learning and improvement,” says Cyrus Mehr, vice president of research & development. “Ultimately, our leading brand customers serve consumers that desire enjoyable, nutritious foods of consistently high quality. To deliver on our promise, we do our best to provide our customers with solutions.

“As development timelines are getting shorter, we work diligently to find ways to be more agile and still meet the customer’s criteria of quality and cost. Over the past few years, we have seen far greater reliance by our customers on turnkey developments.

“For Hearthside, innovation takes many forms, including product, process, technology, formulation, ingredient technology and business process and more,” he continues. “HFS is willing and able to make significant investments in an innovation if it demonstrates customer-tangible benefits. This ultimately benefits the consumer by pushing the envelope on continuous improvement and creating value on behalf of our customers. In my opinion, that’s the best route to success.”

Hearthside Measure smallerThere is no single R&D headquarters or “innovation center” – all are dispersed and attached to manufacturing plants. Mehr sits in the Nashville office, which is the U.S. center of excellence for bars (the European bars center is in Leerdam, Netherlands). Baked goods product development is headquartered in McComb, Ohio; frozen foods is in Shakopee, Minn.; fresh foods is in Seattle. There also is a pilot production facility for bars in Boise, Idaho, and one for baked goods in McComb.

Hearthside’s main product categories are baked goods (cookies, crackers and sandwich-type items with cream or cheese centers), granolas of all kinds, baked and non-baked bars (chewy and crunchy granola bars, energy bars, strudels, crème and fruit filled bars and bites), snack “components” (meaning pretzels, clusters, chips, bread sticks, popcorn and various extruded items that are used in mixed snack varieties), and fresh/chilled and frozen items.

That last category is the latest addition and a divergence for Hearthside. The 2018 acquisition of the U.S. assets of Ireland’s Greencore Group Plc — essentially the former Peacock Foods – brought the company into USDA-regulated categories of fresh, refrigerated and frozen foods such as salads, meals and sandwich wraps; multi-component tray snacks; freeze/thaw sandwiches; and roller dogs, stuffed baguettes, calzones, burritos, paninos, savory pies, chile and cooked sauces.

“Our team consists of 36 food scientists, process technologists, research chefs, lab technologists and labeling specialists,” Mehr continues. “The team works hand-in-hand with commercialization managers at various production sites, operations, QA and supply chain.”

Currently, the hottest innovation areas are bars and refrigerated foods. “Primary areas of our focus are low-carb, low-sugar/no-added-sugar, protein, plant proteins, keto, organic/non-GMO and nut butters of all kinds.

“Broadly speaking, we start with ideation, and the ideas come from a variety of sources: brainstorming sessions, market research (we work with leading market research firms), or trade shows. Then, the ideas are screened internally and, after screening, we will begin the process of prototype development.”

Numerous samples are generated by the team and screened, from which the best concepts are selected. Then the formula/recipes are created and costed.

Hearthside Kitchen“If acceptable, we will plan a pilot test run,” Mehr says. “The purpose of the pilot test is to determine feasibility of production and the process parameters, weight controls and first estimates on run rates, and to identify any ‘watch-outs.’ Samples are collected during pilot run for shelf life, packaging development and sensory evaluation. Once we have successfully completed these steps, preliminary nutritional labeling is generated along with packaging and artwork.

“Next, we plan for a production trial, which includes an engineering evaluation for any additional equipment as well as packaging requirements. [Then] we audit the Nutrition Facts panel and label, finalize product specifications, packaging and cost cards. A plant will then be ready for product launch.”

Mehr says he is particularly proud of recent work “pushing the limits of protein delivery in bars yet keeping sugars in single digits. In 2020, you will see products that deliver those desirable nutritionals with texture and flavor attributes that consumers love.” For what customer or brand? He won’t say.

“You’ll also see cooked and frozen breakfast, lunch and snack protein foods, fully enrobed in delicious biscuit doughs,” he promises. “Processing technology innovation along with formulation innovation makes this achievable.”

All of it done in anonymity. Rich Scalia, Hearthside’s chairman, adds, “We don’t mind the anonymity. In fact, we revel in helping our customers be successful. Our true reward is customer loyalty and the growth of our manufacturing business.”

These Southeast Asian street food concoctions are coming to Burnaby – Burnaby Now

The definition of a concoction is a “mixture of various ingredients or elements.”

I can’t think of a better way to describe Southeast Asian street food – where street vendors in Thailand and Vietnam let you pick all of the ingredients and they whip them up.

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That kind of food freedom is coming to Burnaby in 2020 as part of the Amazing Brentwood’s ginormous expansion.

The Southeast Asian street food-inspired company Basil Box will be opening an outlet in 2020. It currently has just one Metro Vancouver location, on Burrard Street in Vancouver.

Basil Box’s “Our Story” item describes its food like this: “Close your eyes and imagine the sights, smells and sounds of a bustling street market in Southeast Asia. Farmers tending carts piled high with fresh meats, vegetables, and exotic spices beckon, while you navigate your way through food vendors peddling prepared plates chock-full of bold-flavoured local staples and tantalizing delicacies.”

Hopefully, the company can back this up – especially the fresh part.

Customers start with a base of rice, noodles, or greens, and then add veggies, proteins, sauces and toppings in unique combinations.

The menu definitely has a focus on some pretty spicy, with sriracha, sweet chili lime and, according to the company, its hottest Penang curry.

Basil Box also offers gluten-free, keto, low-calorie, low-fat and high-fibre options for people with specific diets.

Follow Chris Campbell on Twitter @shinebox44.

2019 best cookbooks for holiday gift giving – Chicago Tribune

Not until well past the halfway point in her book does Abra Berens mention the word that makes up the title. “You gotta get your ruffage,” she writes, remembering an admonishment from some unnamed person, a parent probably. She wields the phrase to dismiss boring salads, then launches into her love of salads and principles for creating great ones. Eating her vegetables is no chore to the former farmer and now chef, at Granor Farm in southwestern Michigan. Instead, “Ruffage” is a fat, 450-page celebration of vegetables, an instructional tome with 100-plus recipes and myriad flavor variations. It’s broken up into a well-considered pantry section, then the recipes, organized by vegetable, 29 of them, from asparagus to turnips and rutabaga. Essays open each chapter, then buying, storing and prep notes, before the recipes. Berens’ writing style is inviting and true and real; you feel warmly welcomed in these pages. It’s a remarkable book, really, for an untried name in the publishing industry, and it’s a triumph. — J.G.

Allrecipes, America’s Largest Digital Food Media Brand, Marks Highest Trafficked Thanksgiving In Its 22-Year History With 22 Million Visits – KPVI News 6

NEW YORK, Dec. 5, 2019  Meredith Corporation’s (NYSE: MDP, www.meredith.com) Allrecipes recorded 50.4 million visits to its site during Thanksgiving week (Friday—Thursday, November 22—28), up 6.4% year over year, as well as the largest-ever number of Thanksgiving Day website visits, with cooks viewing recipes, step-by-step videos and how-to articles. In a reversal from last year, Thanksgiving Day beat out Thanksgiving eve in total number of visits,* demonstrating that home cooks are increasingly using digital resources when they’re cooking—in addition to planning, shopping and prepping. As further evidence that cooks are taking advantage of in-the-moment guidance for preparing dishes this year, video views on Allrecipes were up 22% year over year on Thanksgiving Day.

“The continued growth of this 22-year-old brand is a testament to the power of Allrecipes’ ability to connect and engage with home cooks, particularly during this peak cooking moment that everyone wants to get just right,” said Catherine Levene, President, Chief Digital Officer of Meredith Corp. “With nearly 1.3 billion visits annually, Allrecipes has become a bellwether for how people are cooking and eating across the country. As we predicted before the holiday, our Thanksgiving weekend data reveals that although Americans still love traditional holiday recipes, they are increasingly seeking out recipes to fit a range of dietary preferences such as keto and vegan, and are expanding their cooking techniques with airfryers and the Instant Pot.”

Recipe engagement on Allrecipes shows that cooks this year employed a wide range of cooking techniques to achieve the perfect bird. Oven roasting remained the most popular method, but there were notable increases in the popularity of preparing turkeys in air fryers (up 431% year over year), Instant Pot® (up 76%), slow cooker (up 12%), smokers (+19%) and by spatchcocking (up 69%).

This year, more cooks looked for side dishes that could accommodate dietary preferences such as vegan side dishes and gluten-free side dishes. Engagement with recipes featuring “keto” in their titles surged 165% year over year with top dishes including breads, stuffing/dressing, vegetable casseroles and pies. Other trends included a rise in interest in cocktail recipes, recipes featuring maple as a flavor, recipes with jalapeno as an ingredient, and recipes for brussels sprouts.

Allrecipes’ Most Popular Thanksgiving 2019 Dishes

  1. Best Green Bean Casserole
  2. Perfect Pumpkin Pie
  3. Candied Yams
  4. How to Cook a Turkey
  5. Yummy Sweet Potato Casserole
  6. Grandma’s Corn Bread Stuffing
  7. Basic Mashed Potatoes
  8. Apple Pie by Grandma Ople
  9. A Simply Perfect Thanksgiving Turkey
  10. Cranberry Sauce

Finally, during Thanksgiving week, cross visits between Allrecipes and grocery ecommerce experiences grew 22% year over year as home cooks used Allrecipes to help guide their online grocery shopping – from inspiration through to purchase.

*This year, Allrecipes saw 11.3 million visits on Thanksgiving Day versus 11.1 million on Thanksgiving eve.

ABOUT ALLRECIPES
Allrecipes, the world’s largest community-driven food brand, provides trusted resources to more than 50 million home cooks, publishes recipes from home cooks around the world who connect and inspire one another through photos, reviews and videos. Since its launch in 1997, Allrecipes has become a dynamic, indispensable resource for cooks of all skill levels seeking trusted recipes, cooking trends, entertaining ideas, every day and holiday meal solutions, grocery savings information and practical cooking tips. The brand helps cooks shop, budget and make healthy, sustainable choices in the kitchen. In addition to the site, Allrecipes produces content across numerous platforms, including voice skills, smart appliances, apps and podcasts. Allrecipes Magazine, the magazine industry’s first large-scale digital-to-print brand extension, reaches an audience of 7.6 million. Published six times a year, the magazine has grown rapidly to a 1.4 million rate base from 500,000 at its inception.

Milkadamia Creamer enriches Dairy-Free, Vegan, and Even Keto Coffee – Go Dairy Free

If you like a little luxury in your morning cup of Joe, then I might suggest Milkadamia Creamer. It’s made with raw macadamias and coconut cream for a rich, but pourable finish.

Milkadamia Creamer Reviews and Info - Dairy-Free, Vegan, and Keto-Friendly Creamers in Sweetened & Unsweetened varieties, and made with raw macadamias and coconut cream. We have ingredients, nutrition, availability, and more.

Milkadamia Creamer enriches Dairy-Free, Vegan, and Even Keto Coffee

Milkadamia originally launched their creamer in three varieties, but they’ve since quietly added a Plain Unsweetened version. It’s already sneaking onto store shelves.

Vanilla

Milkadamia Creamer Reviews and Info - Dairy-Free, Vegan, and Keto-Friendly Creamers in Sweetened & Unsweetened varieties, and made with raw macadamias and coconut cream. We have ingredients, nutrition, availability, and more.Ingredients: macadamia milk (filtered water, macadamias), cane sugar, sunflower oil, coconut cream, calcium carbonate, natural flavors, sunflower lecithin, locust bean gum, salt, gellan gum, potassium citrate, potassium phosphate. Contains: macadamias and coconut.*

Nutrition (per 1 tablespoon serving): 15 calories, 1g fat, 2g carbs, 0g fiber, 2g sugars, 0g protein.*

Unsweetened Vanilla

Milkadamia Creamer Reviews and Info - Dairy-Free, Vegan, and Keto-Friendly Creamers in Sweetened & Unsweetened varieties, and made with raw macadamias and coconut cream. We have ingredients, nutrition, availability, and more.Ingredients: macadamia milk (filtered water, macadamias), sunflower oil, coconut cream, natural flavors, calcium carbonate, sunflower lecithin, locust bean gum, salt, gellan gum, potassium citrate, potassium phosphate. Contains: macadamias and coconut.*

Nutrition (per 1 tablespoon serving): 10 calories, 1g fat, 0g carbs, 0g fiber, 0g sugars, 0g protein.*

Macadamia Fudge

Milkadamia Creamer Reviews and Info - Dairy-Free, Vegan, and Keto-Friendly Creamers in Sweetened & Unsweetened varieties, and made with raw macadamias and coconut cream. We have ingredients, nutrition, availability, and more.Ingredients: macadamia milk, cane sugar, sunflower oil, organic cocoa powder, natural flavors, coconut cream, calcium carbonate, salt, locust bean gum, sunflower lecithin, gellan gum, potassium citrate, potassium phosphate. Contains: macadamias and coconut.*

Nutrition (per 1 tablespoon serving): 10 calories, 1g fat, 1g carbs, 0g fiber, 1g sugars, 0g protein.*

Unsweetened Plain

Milkadamia Creamer Reviews and Info - Dairy-Free, Vegan, and Keto-Friendly Creamers in Sweetened & Unsweetened varieties, and made with raw macadamias and coconut cream. We have ingredients, nutrition, availability, and more.Ingredients: macadamia milk (filtered water, macadamias), sunflower oil, coconut cream, calcium carbonate, locust bean gum, natural flavor, sunflower lecithin, salt, gellan gum, potassium citrate, potassium phosphate. Contains: macadamias and coconut.*

Nutrition (per 1 tablespoon serving): 10 calories, 1g fat, 0g carbs, 0g fiber, 0g sugars, 0g protein.*

More Facts on Milkadamia Creamer

Price: $3.99 per 16-ounce carton

Availability: Milkadamia Creamer is shelf-stable and available at grocers throughout the U.S. You can find select varieties at ALDI, Walmart, and many natural food grocers. It can also be purchased on Amazon.

Certifications: Milkadamia Creamer is Non-GMO Verified and Certified Kosher Pareve.

Dietary Notes: By ingredients, Milkadamia Creamer is dairy-free / non-dairy, egg-free, gluten-free, peanut-free, soy-free, vegan, and vegetarian. The Unsweetened varieties are also keto-friendly.*

For More Product Information: Visit the Milkadamia website at milkadamia.com.

*Always read the ingredient and nutrition statement prior to consumption. Ingredients, processes, and labeling are subject to change at any time for any company or product. Contact the company to discuss their manufacturing processes if potential allergen cross-contamination is an issue for you. No food product can be guaranteed “safe” for every individual’s needs. You should never rely on ingredient and allergen statements alone if dealing with a severe food allergy.

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The 10 Meal Delivery Subscriptions Worth Trying in 2020 – Yahoo Lifestyle

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Adulting is hard enough without throwing meal prep and menu planning into the mix. But holistic health experts consider food to be medicine, with links between diet, inflammation, and chronic illness to prove it. That’s why a balanced diet of fresh, nutritionist-approved, "healthy" foods&nbsp;that you can get delivered would be the dream.” data-reactid=”27″>Adulting is hard enough without throwing meal prep and menu planning into the mix. But holistic health experts consider food to be medicine, with links between diet, inflammation, and chronic illness to prove it. That’s why a balanced diet of fresh, nutritionist-approved, “healthy” foods that you can get delivered would be the dream.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="You might already be rolling your eyes if you suffer from food allergies, intolerances, or sensitive digestion. (Guilty!) I know, I know—the struggle is real. However,&nbsp;not only do diet-conscious meal delivery services&nbsp;exist, but there’s a whole crop of delicious subscriptions available no matter your personal preferences and needs. I had to eliminate gluten and dairy from an already pescatarian diet, for example, and can vouch for how much healthier I felt once I began cooking Sun Basket‘s anti-inflammatory cuisine.” data-reactid=”28″>You might already be rolling your eyes if you suffer from food allergies, intolerances, or sensitive digestion. (Guilty!) I know, I know—the struggle is real. However, not only do diet-conscious meal delivery services exist, but there’s a whole crop of delicious subscriptions available no matter your personal preferences and needs. I had to eliminate gluten and dairy from an already pescatarian diet, for example, and can vouch for how much healthier I felt once I began cooking Sun Basket‘s anti-inflammatory cuisine.

The best part about wellness-minded meal subscription boxes is that they make healthy eating easy to manage with our busy lifestyles. Instead of spending Sunday handling meal prep, you can make time to kick back and indulge in some self-care. When I cook each night, my boyfriend actually calls it my therapy. (Full disclosure: Whether it’s the act of cooking or the glass of wine I cook with that’s responsible for the therapeutic effects is TBD.)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Here are 10 food subscription boxes to try in 2020 to get your work-life-wellness balance just right.” data-reactid=”30″>Here are 10 food subscription boxes to try in 2020 to get your work-life-wellness balance just right.

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="($69 for nine bowls)” data-reactid=”47″>($69 for nine bowls)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Our editor Victoria Hoff can attest to the stress-reducing convenience of not having to worry about meal planning thanks to Daily Harvest‘s portioned-out deliveries of smoothie, soup, meal, and snack bowls. The company knows we’re way too busy to plan, prep, and cook every day; this makes it extra-convenient for us to prep meals on the go without compromising on nutrition.” data-reactid=”48″>Our editor Victoria Hoff can attest to the stress-reducing convenience of not having to worry about meal planning thanks to Daily Harvest‘s portioned-out deliveries of smoothie, soup, meal, and snack bowls. The company knows we’re way too busy to plan, prep, and cook every day; this makes it extra-convenient for us to prep meals on the go without compromising on nutrition.

Whether you’re a fan of overnight oats, smoothies, or savory harvest bowls, the unprocessed, unrefined recipes were developed by a Michelin-starred chef and are delivered frozen and ready for you to blend, heat, mix, and eat. Plus, the packaging doubles as dinnerware, so you can save time on dishes and easily take your farm-frozen, organic, keto- and Paleo-friendly meals to go.

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="($60 per week)” data-reactid=”66″>($60 per week)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Do you love perusing&nbsp;farmers markets for the freshest seasonal selections? If you live in NYC or Washington, D.C., this box literally does it for you. Choose between omnivore, vegetarian, Paleo, and vegan selections, and prepare your palette from the best of what seasonally synced eating has to offer.” data-reactid=”67″>Do you love perusing farmers markets for the freshest seasonal selections? If you live in NYC or Washington, D.C., this box literally does it for you. Choose between omnivore, vegetarian, Paleo, and vegan selections, and prepare your palette from the best of what seasonally synced eating has to offer.

The cool thing about this subscription service is that you’ll receive fresh, sustainably sourced, non–wastefully packaged produce to use as you like. The company provides you with recommended recipes, but you won’t be limited by awkward amounts (e.g., one egg) if you decide to wing it.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Lastly, you know how farmers markets also have gift-worthy gourmet treats? You can even choose a monthly tasting box of thoughtfully curated treats that support small local farms starting at just $30 per month.” data-reactid=”71″>Lastly, you know how farmers markets also have gift-worthy gourmet treats? You can even choose a monthly tasting box of thoughtfully curated treats that support small local farms starting at just $30 per month.

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="(starting at $70 a day)” data-reactid=”88″>(starting at $70 a day)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Arguably the healthy meal delivery service that put healthy meal delivery services on the map, beauty-centric Sakara remains a favorite of models, influencers, and us mere mortals alike.&nbsp;Who What Wear’s beauty editor&nbsp;Erin Jahns recently tried the brand’s new metabolism super powder to glowing results, quite literally. In addition to seeing positive changes in her body and digestion, her complexion benefited too.” data-reactid=”89″>Arguably the healthy meal delivery service that put healthy meal delivery services on the map, beauty-centric Sakara remains a favorite of models, influencers, and us mere mortals alike. Who What Wear’s beauty editor Erin Jahns recently tried the brand’s new metabolism super powder to glowing results, quite literally. In addition to seeing positive changes in her body and digestion, her complexion benefited too.

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="(starting at $11 per meal)” data-reactid=”106″>(starting at $11 per meal)

Green Chef was the first organic, non-GMO meal delivery kit with gluten-free menu options on the market. Each week, you can choose from keto, Paleo, pescatarian, vegetarian, vegan, omnivore, and gluten-free offerings, with prices reflecting each category. The only catch? You select your meals based on the menu classification, not according to which recipe you would like.

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="(starting at $50 a day)” data-reactid=”124″>(starting at $50 a day)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="If you're based in Southern California, you might give this detox-minded subscription a try. The meals are 100% gluten-, soy-, and preservative-free—oh, and they're delicious. (Psst: Definitely nab some of the juices, too.)” data-reactid=”125″>If you’re based in Southern California, you might give this detox-minded subscription a try. The meals are 100% gluten-, soy-, and preservative-free—oh, and they’re delicious. (Psst: Definitely nab some of the juices, too.)

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="(starts at $7.49 a serving)” data-reactid=”142″>(starts at $7.49 a serving)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="HelloFresh&nbsp;is an affordable option—the price per serving is normally $7.49. You can choose from 20 meals each week, with preferences like "meat and veggie," "veggie," "family friendly," and "low calorie." Plus, most of the packaging is recyclable, too. You can choose from&nbsp;plans for two or four people, and for two, three, or four recipes a week.” data-reactid=”143″>HelloFresh is an affordable option—the price per serving is normally $7.49. You can choose from 20 meals each week, with preferences like “meat and veggie,” “veggie,” “family friendly,” and “low calorie.” Plus, most of the packaging is recyclable, too. You can choose from plans for two or four people, and for two, three, or four recipes a week.

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="($5 per box)” data-reactid=”160″>($5 per box)

Touting itself as “the most affordable meal delivery service,” Dinnerly is a great option if you’re looking to budget or reduce waste. By opting for digital recipe cards and minimizing ingredients (six ingredients and six steps per meal), you’re simplifying your mealtime in a big way. You won’t get a grandiose presentation of a high-class meal, but you will get guidance and ingredients brought straight to you—without the need for endless chopping, portioning, shopping, and planning.

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="($12 per meal or $72 per week)” data-reactid=”178″>($12 per meal or $72 per week)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="This is the box for plant-based foodies. Founder and CEO Andy Levitt started the company after discovering the pro-health effects of adopting a plant-based diet. Now he’s making it available to the mainstream. Vegans can choose among high-protein, gluten-free, quick and easy (30 minutes or less), or chef’s-choice meal offerings. Shipping is always free, you can cancel anytime, and you can customize each box to your veggie-loving heart’s content.” data-reactid=”179″>This is the box for plant-based foodies. Founder and CEO Andy Levitt started the company after discovering the pro-health effects of adopting a plant-based diet. Now he’s making it available to the mainstream. Vegans can choose among high-protein, gluten-free, quick and easy (30 minutes or less), or chef’s-choice meal offerings. Shipping is always free, you can cancel anytime, and you can customize each box to your veggie-loving heart’s content.

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="(starting at $12 a serving)” data-reactid=”196″>(starting at $12 a serving)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Each clean meal uses USDA–certified organic ingredients, sustainably sourced from California farms, with gluten-free, Paleo, and vegetarian options. Recipes are created by chef Justine Kelly, a former contestant on Iron Chef America, and recent customizations allow you to opt in on extra proteins, snacks, and even an organic wine club. The rapidly growing company has also added a fulfillment center to allow for a greater delivery range. Other than the occasional hard avocado, I’m regularly impressed by the produce, while my boyfriend (a meat eater) praises the quality of Sun Basket’s cuts. The company is also devoted to a goal of zero-waste, and its packaging is almost completely recycleable.” data-reactid=”197″>Each clean meal uses USDA–certified organic ingredients, sustainably sourced from California farms, with gluten-free, Paleo, and vegetarian options. Recipes are created by chef Justine Kelly, a former contestant on Iron Chef America, and recent customizations allow you to opt in on extra proteins, snacks, and even an organic wine club. The rapidly growing company has also added a fulfillment center to allow for a greater delivery range. Other than the occasional hard avocado, I’m regularly impressed by the produce, while my boyfriend (a meat eater) praises the quality of Sun Basket’s cuts. The company is also devoted to a goal of zero-waste, and its packaging is almost completely recycleable.

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="($11.50/meal or $42/week)” data-reactid=”214″>($11.50/meal or $42/week)

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Thistle is amazing because of its macrobiotically developed menu that emphasizes plant-based, gluten-free, organic ingredients whenever possible. Choose from three to six days' worth of ready-made meals (including breakfast!), snacks, and juices per week, and the company will deliver them straight to you. Plus, it's the easiest prep ever, in that there’s virtually none. Because of its fresh ingredients, Thistle is only available in certain area codes.” data-reactid=”215″>Thistle is amazing because of its macrobiotically developed menu that emphasizes plant-based, gluten-free, organic ingredients whenever possible. Choose from three to six days’ worth of ready-made meals (including breakfast!), snacks, and juices per week, and the company will deliver them straight to you. Plus, it’s the easiest prep ever, in that there’s virtually none. Because of its fresh ingredients, Thistle is only available in certain area codes.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Next up: Here’s Why You Should Care About Probiotics” data-reactid=”216″>Next up: Here’s Why You Should Care About Probiotics

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="This post was published at an earlier date and was updated by Sarah Yang.” data-reactid=”217″>This post was published at an earlier date and was updated by Sarah Yang.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="This article originally appeared on The Thirty” data-reactid=”218″>This article originally appeared on The Thirty

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read More from Who What Wear” data-reactid=”219″>Read More from Who What Wear

These are some of the most famous food fads of the past decade – USA TODAY

Quinoa and kale, for instance, are household words. Avocado toast and pumpkin spice latte are cultural touchstones.

A fad is a “trivial fancy adopted and pursued for a time with irrational zeal…or an important matter imperfectly understood [and] taken up and urged with more zeal than sense” – at least according to an article called “Our Tendency to Fads,” published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1913.

The world of food seems particularly susceptible to fads. It has been estimated that about 15,000 new food products are introduced in the U.S. each year, at least some of them probably destined to become at least minor fads. Every week seems to bring a new diet, a new superfood, a new way of getting food on the table. 

Some food fads prove to have lasting strength, evolving into trends, which then, in turn, evolve into commonplaces – things that become so much a part of our culinary lives that we can’t remember when we didn’t have them, or imagine how we could have managed in their absence.

Whether they prove to be permanent additions to our ways of eating or not, some food fads become famous – written about in all the major epicurean publications, talked about whenever food-lovers chatter, reflected in countless restaurant menus or on every grocery shelf.

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Ready for the holidays?:The 25 best kitchen and cooking gifts of 2019

Quinoa and kale, for instance, are household words. Avocado toast and pumpkin spice latte are cultural touchstones. Almost everybody knows what “paleo” and “keto” mean.

Truly famous food fads often get that way because truly famous people take them up, and a look at some of the best-known and most widely disseminated examples in recent years shows how important the Kardashians and Paltrows and Gagas of the world have been to the way we eat and drink.

Publications that cover the entertainment world assemble photographs of notables eating frozen yogurt or post videos of music stars discussing fried chicken – and magazines and websites of all kinds seem to have an inexhaustible appetite for stories on the way celebrities eat (or stop eating), as if these rarified creatures are sharing healthy eating habits that will change our lives.

With an eye to celebrity endorsements (and sometimes investments), 24/7 Tempo has curated a list of “trivial fancies,” dietary and otherwise, that have proven resilient (and non-trivial) enough to achieve genuine renown.

Americans first took note of it in a big way after Oprah Winfrey publicized it as part of her 21-day "cleanse" diet in 2008.

1. Quinoa

Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah, in case you’ve been in Antarctica for the last ten years) is a nutritious grain-like seed that has been a dietary staple in the Andes for thousands of years. Americans first took note of it in a big way after Oprah Winfrey publicized it as part of her 21-day “cleanse” diet in 2008.

2. Kale

This “superfood” leafy green has been all but inescapable in recent years, sometimes as a cooked vegetable but also in the form of chips or in everything from hummus to pesto to pizza crust. Shout-outs from people like Dr. Oz and Gwyneth Paltrow (who demonstrated making kale chips on “Ellen” in 2011) helped push it into the mainstream, where it seems to still be lingering.

3. Sriracha

The so-called “hipster ketchup,” sriracha is Thai in origin, but has been made in the U.S. under the Huy Fong label since 1980. It started appearing on tables all over the country, at restaurants Asian and otherwise, after it was named Ingredient of the Year by Bon Appétit in 2010, and subsequently lauded in other publications. Amy Adams got teary-eyed expressing her love for the sauce on “The Tonight Show” a few years back, and Nick Jonas has said that he’s a fan of sriracha popcorn.

4. Plant-based meat

Impossible Foods, one of the two major California companies now selling vegan burgers whose flavor and texture approximate those of ground beef, counts Katy Perry, Serena Williams, Jay-Z, Trevor Noah, and Will.i.am among its investors. Its rival, Beyond Meat, does pretty well in the celebrity investor department, too, with such bold-face names as Leonardo DiCaprio, Snoop Dogg, Jessica Chastain, Shaquille O’Neill, and Lindsey Vonn on board. Between them, the two firms sell their products at chains like Burger King, Carl’s Jr., White Castle, Subway, and Dunkin’, and increasingly in supermarkets as well.

5. Photographing your food

Whether it’s Beyond Meat or Certified Black Angus, people today photograph their burgers – and every other kind of food imaginable – before actually eating it. The co-founder of Instagram posted the app’s first-ever food photo (before the app was even called Instagram) from a taco stand in Mexico in 2010. Today, more than 130 million Instagram posts are hashtagged #foodporn and a 2017 study found 69% of those aged 18 to 34 had taken a photograph or video of food they were about to eat and posted it on social media.

The co-founder of Instagram posted the app's first-ever food photo from a taco stand in Mexico in 2010.

6. Avocado toast

Avocado toast was apparently invented at a restaurant called Bills in Sydney, Australia, in 1993, but it didn’t take off in America until 2013, when Gwyneth Paltrow included a recipe for it in her cookbook “It’s All Good.” Jessica Alba, Chrissy Teigen, Kate Beckinsale, and Drew Barrymore are among the many celebs who have since graced us with their own variations on the theme.

7. Cupcakes

Reality shows like “Cupcake Wars” and “Cupcakes Girls” helped fuel the cupcake craze, which started in the 2000s but continued to pick up steam in the present decade. Famous fans of the little frosted confections include Lauren Conrad, Sofia Vergara, Denise Richards, and both Kim and Khloe Kardashian.

8. Frozen yogurt

Froyo has been around for decades, but in the early 2010s, a new generation of purveyors began appearing, offering larger flavor selections and add-ons like M&Ms, Oreos, and crushed candy bars that seemed to counteract whatever health benefits the stuff may have over ice cream. Photographic evidence exists of such personalities as Adam Sandler, Lindsay Lohan, Gene Simmons, Elle Fanning, and Bella Hadid showing their love for this icy dessert.

9. Gluten-free everything

An estimated 1% of the world’s population suffers from a serious autoimmune condition called celiac disease, triggered by exposure to gluten, a protein found in wheat and other grains. A much larger percentage identifies as gluten-intolerant but not celiac, while still others go gluten-free because they think it’s better for their health. It might almost be easier to name the famous folk who have no problem with the stuff than those who avoid – or have avoided – it. Their number includes Ryan Phillippe, Victoria Beckham, Miley Cyrus, Lady Gaga, Rachel Weisz, Billy Bob Thornton, Russell Crowe, and Chelsea Clinton and her dad.

10. Bacon Everywhere

Almost every non-vegetarian-or-vegan’s favorite food, bacon has an unmistakable flavor and an irresistible aroma, and as if the thing itself weren’t more than sufficient, bacon-flavored foods and beverages seem to just keep coming. Fictional bacon obsessives have included Joey Tribbiani on “Friends,” Agent Cooper on “Twin Peaks,” Ron Swanson on “Parks and Recreation,” and of course good old omnivorous Homer Simpson. In real life, believe it or not, Gwyneth Paltrow is on record as saying (to The Telegraph in London three years ago), “I’m not sure how healthy bacon is in general, but I know it’s incredibly delicious.”

Bacon-flavored foods and beverages seem to just keep coming.

11. Pumpkin spice mania

Blame Starbucks for getting this whole thing started back in 2004 when it rolled out its Pumpkin Spice Latte nationally. Every other coffee and fast food chain soon followed suit, and that it turn led to all kinds of pumpkin-spice things (which in general means they’re flavored with cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, allspice, and sometimes cloves). Trader Joe’s alone sells about 60 products in the genre, and it is now possible to indulge your pumpkin-spice craving with everything from almonds to cheese to a martini. Taylor Swift once wrote that one of the great things about fall was “not caring when people make fun of pumpkin flavored stuff cause you LOVE IT.” Fall Out Boy bassist Pete Wentz thought it might be a good idea to “start a gentleman’s club that enjoys pumpkin spice lattes,” and even hypercritical chef Gordon Ramsay once allowed as how he enjoyed PSLs when fall rolled around.

12. Alternative milks

Vegan Ariana Grande likes soy milk in her macchiato. Jennifer Aniston puts almond milk in her smoothies. Those are just a couple of examples of mock-dairy, though. Oats, flax seeds, cashews, hazelnuts, walnuts, macadamias, peas, rice, peanuts, coconut, chickpeas, hemp, and more get turned into “milk” these days. The dairy industry hates the trend (and the fact that these alternative creamers are called “milk”), but with the kind of publicity these substances are getting, you probably can’t put the craze back in the bottle.

13. Kombucha

Kombucha is fermented tea, probably invented in China about 2,000 years ago. It hit American shores in the 1990s and took off in the 2010s, showing a 28% sales increase between 2010 and 2011 alone. It’s estimated that it will be racking up annual sales of $1.8 billion by 2020. What notables quaff it? Orlando Bloom, Jake Gyllenhaal, Zoe Kravitz, Lady Gaga, Reese Witherspoon, and of course Gwyneth Paltrow, among others.

14. Apple Cider Vinegar

Chances are that if somebody told you that by swigging a little apple cider vinegar daily, you could lose weight, avoid diabetes, cure a sore throat, have cleaner teeth, and improve your skin and hair, you’d reach for a bottle – right? And that’s exactly what some of its exponents claim – apparently not without some evidence in many cases. Scarlett Johansson, Hilary Duff, Miranda Kerr, and trend-setters (-followers?) Kim and Kourtney Kardashian all apparently think it works.

15. Coconut water

Demi Moore, Sienna Miller, and Madonna are among the film and music stars who swear by coconut water. This isn’t to be confused with coconut milk, which is the rich, creamy substance made from grated coconut. Instead, it’s the liquid that sloshes around inside a young green coconut. It’s a nutritious natural beverage that’s good for hydration. Does it really reduce blood pressure, protect against diabetes, help prevent kidney stones, and all the other things its proponents believe? Maybe.

This isn't to be confused with coconut milk, which is the rich, creamy substance made from grated coconut.

16. Edibles

Recreational marijuana is now legal in 11 states, and has been decriminalized in a number of others – and cannabis-spiked foods (and drinks) are increasingly common. Not surprisingly, a number of celebrities are getting in on the act, not just enjoying these products but investing in them – including people like well-known aficionados Snoop Dogg and Willie Nelson (well, of course) and Snoop’s good buddy Martha Stewart, as well as everyone from Melissa Etheridge to Mike Tyson to Seth Rogan.

17. Rainbow foods

Rainbow cake, rainbow doughnuts, rainbow pasta, rainbow burger buns, rainbow popcorn balls, rainbow bagels (which may have gotten the trend started)… Everybody loves nice colors, but where will the proliferation of what Eater once described as “foods that look like they belong in a Lisa Frank-designed universe populated by unicorns” end? The fad appeared to be waning a few years back, but seems to have found new life as an expression of LGBT pride. One big fan of rainbow bagels is reality-TV star and Kardashian bestie Foodgod (born Jonathan Cheban).

18. Food delivery apps

Here’s a trend that doesn’t need celebrity assistance. It’s here to stay, on seemingly every socioeconomic and culinary level. According to DoorDash, the leader in the field, 66% of the customers they surveyed claimed that delivery was their favorite way to get dinner on the table, above cooking, picking up takeout, or going to a restaurant (in that order). More than 38 million people will use their phones, tablets, or computers to order meals in the U.S. this year, a 21% increase over 2018. For those people who do like to cook, especially if they’re concerned about their health, meal delivery kits are also a thing, with the likes of Martha Stewart, Beyoncé, and Tom Brady branding such enterprises.

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19. Food trucks

Like food delivery services, these are now a permanent part of the culinary landscape. L.A.-based Korean-American chef Roy Choi may have gotten the whole thing started with his first Kogi Truck in late 2008, becoming a food celebrity when both his operations and the trend in general took off. Since then, already established chefs like the Food Network’s late-’90s “Too Hot Tamales” (Mary Sue Miliken and Susan Feniger) and the ubiquitous José Andrés have gotten into the act. The food truck industry has grown an average of 7.9% per year since 2011, and reported $2.7 billion in revenue in 2017.

20. Chicken sandwiches

Boneless fried chicken sandwiches are everywhere these days. All the big chains have their versions, and two of them became protagonists in this summer’s “chicken wars,” as Chick-fil-A (which claims to have invented the sandwich) and Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen (which introduced theirs to great fanfare in August) trolled each other on social media. Popeyes’ version was so instantly popular that the chain ran out of chicken, and ended up taking the sandwich off the menu for a couple of months. Cardi B, Justin Bieber, and reality TV star Tamar Braxton were among the celebs who weighed in on the subject (Bieber that the Popeyes sandwich was good but “not worth hype.”)

Popeyes' version was so instantly popular that the chain ran out of chicken, and ended up taking the sandwich off the menu for a couple of months.

21. Sugar-free diets

Gwyneth Paltrow went sugar-free in 2010, so you know it must be a thing to do (though she has been known to backslide). Other famous folk who have given the diet a try include Kourtney Kardashian, Adele, Kate Hudson, and Alec Baldwin. This doesn’t just mean passing on the ice cream and drinking your coffee black. Serious sugar-free dieters give up not just sugar but also honey, maple syrup, and even some kinds of fruit (like bananas). The rationale? Not just the calories all that sweetness provides but the fact that sugar is poison – at least according to Huffington Post contributor Dr. David Samadi and other doctors, nutritionists, and scientists.

22. Paleo diet

The paleo (or caveman) diet was first outlined in 1975, given a boost by a book called “The Paleolithic Prescription” in 1988, and supported by numerous publications appearing in the 2000s. It became a hot trend only in this decade, though, after such celebrities as Jessica Biel, Kobe Bryant, and Miley Cyrus advocated for it. Paleo supposedly echoes the way people ate back when they were Neanderthals – meaning a diet of lean meats and fish, fruits and vegetables, and nuts and seeds but no dairy products, grains, or legumes.

23. Keto eating

Dairy products are just fine on the keto regimen, hailed as “the most popular diet of 2018” (Google searches for the term far exceeded those for “paleo” or “intermittent fasting). Fruits and vegetables not so much. Originally developed as a treatment for epilepsy, this style of very-low-carb, very-high-fat eating takes its name from the fact that it produces ketones – acidic chemicals released by the liver when the body has insufficient insulin. This supposedly helps adherents lose weight and helps fight diabetes and other conditions – though some doctors warn it could induce low blood pressure, nutritional deficiencies, and an increased risk of heart disease. That apparently doesn’t bother such keto fans as Katie Couric, LeBron James, Tim Tebow, Vanessa Fox, Vanessa Hudgens, and (well, of course) Gwyneth Paltrow and the Kardashians.

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24. Intermittent fasting

Eating just one meal a day; restricting calorie intake (typically to 500 calories for women, 600 for men) for two or three days a week; or following eating patterns like 16:8 (eating only within one eight-hour period, with no other food allowed) – all are examples of intermittent fasting, believed to help practitioners lose weight, lower the risk of type 2 diabetes, and even help prevent cancer. Celebrities who have tried it, apparently successfully, include Chris Pratt, Jennifer Aniston, Moby, Halle Berry, Jimmy Kimmel, and Kourtney Kardashian.

Some studies question the supposed health benefits of juicing, but that hasn't stopped celebrities from embracing the trend.

25. Juicing

Juicing – forgoing solid food and drinking only fruit and vegetable juices for days or even weeks at a time – is said to promote weight loss and “detox” the system (the regimen is sometimes called a “juice cleanse”). Many brands of detox-appropriate juice are sold commercially, but those who prefer to concoct their own can buy a pricey home juicer (they can cost as much as $400). Some studies question the supposed health benefits of juicing, but that hasn’t stopped such marquee names as Blake Lively, Colin Farrell, Salma Hayek, and the inevitable Gwyneth Paltrow from embracing the trend.

24/7 Wall Street is a USA TODAY content partner offering financial news and commentary. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.

Chicken sandwiches, bacon on everything are among the biggest food fads of the past decade – USA TODAY

A fad is a “trivial fancy adopted and pursued for a time with irrational zeal…or an important matter imperfectly understood [and] taken up and urged with more zeal than sense” – at least according to an article called “Our Tendency to Fads,” published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1913.

The world of food seems particularly susceptible to fads. It has been estimated that about 15,000 new food products are introduced in the U.S. each year, at least some of them probably destined to become at least minor fads. Every week seems to bring a new diet, a new superfood, a new way of getting food on the table. 

Some food fads prove to have lasting strength, evolving into trends, which then, in turn, evolve into commonplaces – things that become so much a part of our culinary lives that we can’t remember when we didn’t have them, or imagine how we could have managed in their absence.

Whether they prove to be permanent additions to our ways of eating or not, some food fads become famous – written about in all the major epicurean publications, talked about whenever food-lovers chatter, reflected in countless restaurant menus or on every grocery shelf.

Where to eat?:Here are 20 of the best food cities in America for 2019

Ready for the holidays?:The 25 best kitchen and cooking gifts of 2019

Quinoa and kale, for instance, are household words. Avocado toast and pumpkin spice latte are cultural touchstones. Almost everybody knows what “paleo” and “keto” mean.

Truly famous food fads often get that way because truly famous people take them up, and a look at some of the best-known and most widely disseminated examples in recent years shows how important the Kardashians and Paltrows and Gagas of the world have been to the way we eat and drink.

Publications that cover the entertainment world assemble photographs of notables eating frozen yogurt or post videos of music stars discussing fried chicken – and magazines and websites of all kinds seem to have an inexhaustible appetite for stories on the way celebrities eat (or stop eating), as if these rarified creatures are sharing healthy eating habits that will change our lives.

With an eye to celebrity endorsements (and sometimes investments), 24/7 Tempo has curated a list of “trivial fancies,” dietary and otherwise, that have proven resilient (and non-trivial) enough to achieve genuine renown.

Americans first took note of it in a big way after Oprah Winfrey publicized it as part of her 21-day "cleanse" diet in 2008.

1. Quinoa

Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah, in case you’ve been in Antarctica for the last ten years) is a nutritious grain-like seed that has been a dietary staple in the Andes for thousands of years. Americans first took note of it in a big way after Oprah Winfrey publicized it as part of her 21-day “cleanse” diet in 2008.

2. Kale

This “superfood” leafy green has been all but inescapable in recent years, sometimes as a cooked vegetable but also in the form of chips or in everything from hummus to pesto to pizza crust. Shout-outs from people like Dr. Oz and Gwyneth Paltrow (who demonstrated making kale chips on “Ellen” in 2011) helped push it into the mainstream, where it seems to still be lingering.

3. Sriracha

The so-called “hipster ketchup,” sriracha is Thai in origin, but has been made in the U.S. under the Huy Fong label since 1980. It started appearing on tables all over the country, at restaurants Asian and otherwise, after it was named Ingredient of the Year by Bon Appétit in 2010, and subsequently lauded in other publications. Amy Adams got teary-eyed expressing her love for the sauce on “The Tonight Show” a few years back, and Nick Jonas has said that he’s a fan of sriracha popcorn.

4. Plant-based meat

Impossible Foods, one of the two major California companies now selling vegan burgers whose flavor and texture approximate those of ground beef, counts Katy Perry, Serena Williams, Jay-Z, Trevor Noah, and Will.i.am among its investors. Its rival, Beyond Meat, does pretty well in the celebrity investor department, too, with such bold-face names as Leonardo DiCaprio, Snoop Dogg, Jessica Chastain, Shaquille O’Neill, and Lindsey Vonn on board. Between them, the two firms sell their products at chains like Burger King, Carl’s Jr., White Castle, Subway, and Dunkin’, and increasingly in supermarkets as well.

5. Photographing your food

Whether it’s Beyond Meat or Certified Black Angus, people today photograph their burgers – and every other kind of food imaginable – before actually eating it. The co-founder of Instagram posted the app’s first-ever food photo (before the app was even called Instagram) from a taco stand in Mexico in 2010. Today, more than 130 million Instagram posts are hashtagged #foodporn and a 2017 study found 69% of those aged 18 to 34 had taken a photograph or video of food they were about to eat and posted it on social media.

The co-founder of Instagram posted the app's first-ever food photo from a taco stand in Mexico in 2010.

6. Avocado toast

Avocado toast was apparently invented at a restaurant called Bills in Sydney, Australia, in 1993, but it didn’t take off in America until 2013, when Gwyneth Paltrow included a recipe for it in her cookbook “It’s All Good.” Jessica Alba, Chrissy Teigen, Kate Beckinsale, and Drew Barrymore are among the many celebs who have since graced us with their own variations on the theme.

7. Cupcakes

Reality shows like “Cupcake Wars” and “Cupcakes Girls” helped fuel the cupcake craze, which started in the 2000s but continued to pick up steam in the present decade. Famous fans of the little frosted confections include Lauren Conrad, Sofia Vergara, Denise Richards, and both Kim and Khloe Kardashian.

8. Frozen yogurt

Froyo has been around for decades, but in the early 2010s, a new generation of purveyors began appearing, offering larger flavor selections and add-ons like M&Ms, Oreos, and crushed candy bars that seemed to counteract whatever health benefits the stuff may have over ice cream. Photographic evidence exists of such personalities as Adam Sandler, Lindsay Lohan, Gene Simmons, Elle Fanning, and Bella Hadid showing their love for this icy dessert.

9. Gluten-free everything

An estimated 1% of the world’s population suffers from a serious autoimmune condition called celiac disease, triggered by exposure to gluten, a protein found in wheat and other grains. A much larger percentage identifies as gluten-intolerant but not celiac, while still others go gluten-free because they think it’s better for their health. It might almost be easier to name the famous folk who have no problem with the stuff than those who avoid – or have avoided – it. Their number includes Ryan Phillippe, Victoria Beckham, Miley Cyrus, Lady Gaga, Rachel Weisz, Billy Bob Thornton, Russell Crowe, and Chelsea Clinton and her dad.

10. Bacon Everywhere

Almost every non-vegetarian-or-vegan’s favorite food, bacon has an unmistakable flavor and an irresistible aroma, and as if the thing itself weren’t more than sufficient, bacon-flavored foods and beverages seem to just keep coming. Fictional bacon obsessives have included Joey Tribbiani on “Friends,” Agent Cooper on “Twin Peaks,” Ron Swanson on “Parks and Recreation,” and of course good old omnivorous Homer Simpson. In real life, believe it or not, Gwyneth Paltrow is on record as saying (to The Telegraph in London three years ago), “I’m not sure how healthy bacon is in general, but I know it’s incredibly delicious.”

Bacon-flavored foods and beverages seem to just keep coming.

11. Pumpkin spice mania

Blame Starbucks for getting this whole thing started back in 2004 when it rolled out its Pumpkin Spice Latte nationally. Every other coffee and fast food chain soon followed suit, and that it turn led to all kinds of pumpkin-spice things (which in general means they’re flavored with cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, allspice, and sometimes cloves). Trader Joe’s alone sells about 60 products in the genre, and it is now possible to indulge your pumpkin-spice craving with everything from almonds to cheese to a martini. Taylor Swift once wrote that one of the great things about fall was “not caring when people make fun of pumpkin flavored stuff cause you LOVE IT.” Fall Out Boy bassist Pete Wentz thought it might be a good idea to “start a gentleman’s club that enjoys pumpkin spice lattes,” and even hypercritical chef Gordon Ramsay once allowed as how he enjoyed PSLs when fall rolled around.

12. Alternative milks

Vegan Ariana Grande likes soy milk in her macchiato. Jennifer Aniston puts almond milk in her smoothies. Those are just a couple of examples of mock-dairy, though. Oats, flax seeds, cashews, hazelnuts, walnuts, macadamias, peas, rice, peanuts, coconut, chickpeas, hemp, and more get turned into “milk” these days. The dairy industry hates the trend (and the fact that these alternative creamers are called “milk”), but with the kind of publicity these substances are getting, you probably can’t put the craze back in the bottle.

13. Kombucha

Kombucha is fermented tea, probably invented in China about 2,000 years ago. It hit American shores in the 1990s and took off in the 2010s, showing a 28% sales increase between 2010 and 2011 alone. It’s estimated that it will be racking up annual sales of $1.8 billion by 2020. What notables quaff it? Orlando Bloom, Jake Gyllenhaal, Zoe Kravitz, Lady Gaga, Reese Witherspoon, and of course Gwyneth Paltrow, among others.

14. Apple Cider Vinegar

Chances are that if somebody told you that by swigging a little apple cider vinegar daily, you could lose weight, avoid diabetes, cure a sore throat, have cleaner teeth, and improve your skin and hair, you’d reach for a bottle – right? And that’s exactly what some of its exponents claim – apparently not without some evidence in many cases. Scarlett Johansson, Hilary Duff, Miranda Kerr, and trend-setters (-followers?) Kim and Kourtney Kardashian all apparently think it works.

15. Coconut water

Demi Moore, Sienna Miller, and Madonna are among the film and music stars who swear by coconut water. This isn’t to be confused with coconut milk, which is the rich, creamy substance made from grated coconut. Instead, it’s the liquid that sloshes around inside a young green coconut. It’s a nutritious natural beverage that’s good for hydration. Does it really reduce blood pressure, protect against diabetes, help prevent kidney stones, and all the other things its proponents believe? Maybe.

This isn't to be confused with coconut milk, which is the rich, creamy substance made from grated coconut.

16. Edibles

Recreational marijuana is now legal in 11 states, and has been decriminalized in a number of others – and cannabis-spiked foods (and drinks) are increasingly common. Not surprisingly, a number of celebrities are getting in on the act, not just enjoying these products but investing in them – including people like well-known aficionados Snoop Dogg and Willie Nelson (well, of course) and Snoop’s good buddy Martha Stewart, as well as everyone from Melissa Etheridge to Mike Tyson to Seth Rogan.

17. Rainbow foods

Rainbow cake, rainbow doughnuts, rainbow pasta, rainbow burger buns, rainbow popcorn balls, rainbow bagels (which may have gotten the trend started)… Everybody loves nice colors, but where will the proliferation of what Eater once described as “foods that look like they belong in a Lisa Frank-designed universe populated by unicorns” end? The fad appeared to be waning a few years back, but seems to have found new life as an expression of LGBT pride. One big fan of rainbow bagels is reality-TV star and Kardashian bestie Foodgod (born Jonathan Cheban).

18. Food delivery apps

Here’s a trend that doesn’t need celebrity assistance. It’s here to stay, on seemingly every socioeconomic and culinary level. According to DoorDash, the leader in the field, 66% of the customers they surveyed claimed that delivery was their favorite way to get dinner on the table, above cooking, picking up takeout, or going to a restaurant (in that order). More than 38 million people will use their phones, tablets, or computers to order meals in the U.S. this year, a 21% increase over 2018. For those people who do like to cook, especially if they’re concerned about their health, meal delivery kits are also a thing, with the likes of Martha Stewart, Beyoncé, and Tom Brady branding such enterprises.

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19. Food trucks

Like food delivery services, these are now a permanent part of the culinary landscape. L.A.-based Korean-American chef Roy Choi may have gotten the whole thing started with his first Kogi Truck in late 2008, becoming a food celebrity when both his operations and the trend in general took off. Since then, already established chefs like the Food Network’s late-’90s “Too Hot Tamales” (Mary Sue Miliken and Susan Feniger) and the ubiquitous José Andrés have gotten into the act. The food truck industry has grown an average of 7.9% per year since 2011, and reported $2.7 billion in revenue in 2017.

20. Chicken sandwiches

Boneless fried chicken sandwiches are everywhere these days. All the big chains have their versions, and two of them became protagonists in this summer’s “chicken wars,” as Chick-fil-A (which claims to have invented the sandwich) and Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen (which introduced theirs to great fanfare in August) trolled each other on social media. Popeyes’ version was so instantly popular that the chain ran out of chicken, and ended up taking the sandwich off the menu for a couple of months. Cardi B, Justin Bieber, and reality TV star Tamar Braxton were among the celebs who weighed in on the subject (Bieber that the Popeyes sandwich was good but “not worth hype.”)

Popeyes' version was so instantly popular that the chain ran out of chicken, and ended up taking the sandwich off the menu for a couple of months.

21. Sugar-free diets

Gwyneth Paltrow went sugar-free in 2010, so you know it must be a thing to do (though she has been known to backslide). Other famous folk who have given the diet a try include Kourtney Kardashian, Adele, Kate Hudson, and Alec Baldwin. This doesn’t just mean passing on the ice cream and drinking your coffee black. Serious sugar-free dieters give up not just sugar but also honey, maple syrup, and even some kinds of fruit (like bananas). The rationale? Not just the calories all that sweetness provides but the fact that sugar is poison – at least according to Huffington Post contributor Dr. David Samadi and other doctors, nutritionists, and scientists.

22. Paleo diet

The paleo (or caveman) diet was first outlined in 1975, given a boost by a book called “The Paleolithic Prescription” in 1988, and supported by numerous publications appearing in the 2000s. It became a hot trend only in this decade, though, after such celebrities as Jessica Biel, Kobe Bryant, and Miley Cyrus advocated for it. Paleo supposedly echoes the way people ate back when they were Neanderthals – meaning a diet of lean meats and fish, fruits and vegetables, and nuts and seeds but no dairy products, grains, or legumes.

23. Keto eating

Dairy products are just fine on the keto regimen, hailed as “the most popular diet of 2018” (Google searches for the term far exceeded those for “paleo” or “intermittent fasting). Fruits and vegetables not so much. Originally developed as a treatment for epilepsy, this style of very-low-carb, very-high-fat eating takes its name from the fact that it produces ketones – acidic chemicals released by the liver when the body has insufficient insulin. This supposedly helps adherents lose weight and helps fight diabetes and other conditions – though some doctors warn it could induce low blood pressure, nutritional deficiencies, and an increased risk of heart disease. That apparently doesn’t bother such keto fans as Katie Couric, LeBron James, Tim Tebow, Vanessa Fox, Vanessa Hudgens, and (well, of course) Gwyneth Paltrow and the Kardashians.

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24. Intermittent fasting

Eating just one meal a day; restricting calorie intake (typically to 500 calories for women, 600 for men) for two or three days a week; or following eating patterns like 16:8 (eating only within one eight-hour period, with no other food allowed) – all are examples of intermittent fasting, believed to help practitioners lose weight, lower the risk of type 2 diabetes, and even help prevent cancer. Celebrities who have tried it, apparently successfully, include Chris Pratt, Jennifer Aniston, Moby, Halle Berry, Jimmy Kimmel, and Kourtney Kardashian.

Some studies question the supposed health benefits of juicing, but that hasn't stopped celebrities from embracing the trend.

25. Juicing

Juicing – forgoing solid food and drinking only fruit and vegetable juices for days or even weeks at a time – is said to promote weight loss and “detox” the system (the regimen is sometimes called a “juice cleanse”). Many brands of detox-appropriate juice are sold commercially, but those who prefer to concoct their own can buy a pricey home juicer (they can cost as much as $400). Some studies question the supposed health benefits of juicing, but that hasn’t stopped such marquee names as Blake Lively, Colin Farrell, Salma Hayek, and the inevitable Gwyneth Paltrow from embracing the trend.

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