Tim Tebow brags about skipping cheat days as secret to success – Yahoo Sports

Eating a healthy diet can be tough as a minor leaguer. Players in Single-A make as little as $1,160 per month, and per diems are often just $25 for road games.

However, few minor leaguers live like Tim Tebow.

After a lucrative (albeit brief) career in the NFL and as an ESPN analyst, Tebow can afford to eat better than just about any minor leaguer. So what is his diet?

As it turns out, exceedingly meticulous. Tebow told a group of media members on Monday that he is on a ketogenic diet — high in protein with almost no carbs — and never has a cheat day.

“I’ve always stuck with my discipline with stuff like that,” Tebow said before his game with the Triple-A. “I’ve kind of always been that way. The things I knew weren’t healthy for me, I’ve stayed away from since I was 15.”

Tebow’s keto diet means almost every stadium food is a no-go. No fries or chicken fingers. No mac and cheese or pizza. Maybe a hotdog or hamburger without a bun.

As further proof of his dedication to healthy eating, Tebow has spent most of his life not drinking soda — he said he hasn’t had a sip since he was 15. Body is a temple and all that.

Mets minor leaguer Tim Tebow detailed his disciplined diet. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

Mets minor leaguer Tim Tebow detailed his disciplined diet. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

Mets minor leaguer Tim Tebow detailed his disciplined diet. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

“Well they make keto ice cream now and they make some keto cake,” Tebow said. “Honestly it’s really tough to splurge. My brain just doesn’t allow me to even though some people have a cheat day or a cheat weekend.”

Tebow’s discipline is necessary considering how much more work he has ahead of him. Although he’s already in Triple-A, he hit just .273/.336/.399 with a 34.6 percent strikeout rate last year and is off to a .161/.235/.226 start with even more strikeouts through nine games this year.

“It’s hard for me to wake up and say today is the day I’m not going to get better at something,” Tebow said. “(This) is when I’m not going to be focused on trying to get better, it’s just not how my brain works. It’s like I’m more at peace if I feel like I’m doing the best thing to get to where I want to go, where my goals are. Every day I want to take another step towards that. Not ‘oh this is a good day to relax, so I’m farther from it.’”

More from Yahoo Sports:

To Attract Health-Conscious Consumers, Brewers Focus on Functional Ingredients – Brewbound.com

Bee Pollen. Quinoa. Pink Himalayan sea salt.

You wouldn’t ordinarily expect to find these ingredients listed on a beer label, but increasingly brewing companies are pushing more “functional” offerings as they look to appeal to consumers seeking healthier alcohol options.

It’s a new approach for a growing number of craft breweries, who for years have churned out calorie-dense, barrel-aged stouts, and high-octane IPAs. Now, they’re turning to lighter and more sessionable offerings, often made with non-traditional ingredients, as a source of growth.

Dogfish Head, which has long prided itself on “brewing beers with culinary ingredients,” is perhaps one of the most well-known craft brewing companies leaning into the health and wellness trend.

In 2017, the company launched its 140-calorie SeaQuench Ale, brewed with black limes and sea salt. Sales of SeaQuench were up 96 percent over the 52-week period ending February 17, 2019, according to data from market research firm IRI, and the early success of a lighter offering led Dogfish to consider the development of additional products for active lifestyle consumers.

“With the meteoric success of SeaQuench Ale growing to be the best selling sour beer in America, we learned from consumers that approachable, refreshing, super-flavorful beers are what they’re seeking when making choices about beverages,” founder Sam Calagione said.

The company recently rolled out SuperEIGHT, a 5.3 percent ABV sour beer that was “specifically designed for active lifestyle enthusiasts interested in incorporating high-quality ingredients in their beer choices.”

If that sounds like a long-winded way of saying “this beer is probably healthier for you,” it’s because alcohol manufacturers are restricted from making claims about the functional benefits – real or perceived – of their products.

However, that hasn’t stopped Dogfish and other booze makers from finding creative ways to let drinkers know what they’re getting into. Observant consumers can easily spot that SuperEIGHT “Super Gose” is made with “eight heroic ingredients,” including prickly pear, mango, boysenberry, blackberry, raspberry, elderberry, kiwi juice, and quinoa. Hawaiian sea salt is also added to the brew, according to the company.

Other companies, such as upstart Crook & Marker – which produces gluten-free, “spiked and sparkling” beverages made with quinoa, amaranth, millet, and cassava root – are attempting to attract health-conscious consumers by talking about what is (or isn’t) in their products.

At an industry conference earlier this year, Crook & Marker founder Ben Weiss, who created Bai Antioxidant Beverages and sold it to Keurig Dr Pepper in 2016 for $1.7 billion, boldly exclaimed that the “craft beer boom is done.”

“The millennials are wreaking havoc on this industry,” he said. “That millennial consumer is now acutely conscious of calories, and it [craft beer] becomes a bit of a false proposition for them.”

His solution? An organic spiked-and-sparkling beverage that comes in eight flavor varieties (black cherry, tangerine, strawberry-lemon, blackberry-lemon, grapefruit, mango, peach, and coconut pineapple), contains zero sugar and is sweetened with stevia leaf extract and erythritol.

Similarly, Dogfish Head spent about a year-and-a-half designing Slightly Mighty, a 4 percent ABV, 95-calorie “Low-Cal IPA” with 3.6 grams of carbohydrates. The beer is brewed with monk fruit extract and is poised to compete with Anheuser-Busch’s Michelob Ultra brand, which is marketed to athletes and checks in at 4.2 percent ABV, 95 calories and 2.5 grams of carbs.

But Calagione and Weiss aren’t alone in their quests to cut into surging sales of Michelob Ultra, which grew 15.7 percent, to $1.9 billion, at off-premise chain retail stores during the 52-week period ending February 24, according to IRI.

Boston Beer Company, the country’s second-largest craft beer maker, also took its 26.2 Brew national this year. Cans and bottles of the 4 percent ABV, 120-calorie “golden, hazy ale” are adorned with the iconic blue and yellow Boston Athletic Association branding and feature the group’s unicorn logo, which the company hopes will attract endurance runners.

The beer itself is brewed with pink Himalayan sea salt and is being marketed to marathon runners as a better-for-you, post-race refreshment option.

“Understanding what is important to runners is what made brewing this beer different from what is currently available,” said Shelley Smith, Boston Beer Company’s manager of research and product innovation. “While most brewers are stripping flavor to hit a certain calorie mark, we focused on brewing a beer that not only fit what runners were looking for but also delivered a great taste.”

The list of products being marketed toward wellness-minded consumers who count calories and scrutinize nutrition labels is growing longer by the day. And as you would expect, the country’s largest beer companies are paying attention.

In March, Constellation Brands-owned Ballast Point Brewing released a 4.2 percent ABV lager with 99 calories and 3.5 grams of carbs that is positioned as the “go-to beer for your next outdoor adventure.”

Before that, MillerCoors-owned Saint Archer Brewing debuted its 95-calorie craft light lager, which is called “Gold” and has 2.6 grams of carbs, in four test markets. It also created television ads to promote the new brew.

For its part, Anheuser-Busch has doubled down on the success of Michelob Ultra with a “keto-friendly” prickly pear line extension.

Three other notable craft breweries – Colorado’s Avery Brewing, Missouri’s Boulevard Brewing, and Massachusetts’ Harpoon Brewing – have also rolled out sport-themed beers with functional ingredients in recent months. Avery’s “Go Play” IPA is brewed with sodium and potassium, while Boulevard’s Easy Sport “Recreation Ale” contains magnesium, potassium, sea salt, and tangerine peel. And Harpoon’s “Rec League” hazy pale ale is made with buckwheat kasha, chia seeds, Omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants, and Mediterranean sea salt.

Meanwhile, Deschutes Brewery, the 10th largest craft brewery in the U.S., appears poised to become the next craft brewery staking its claim in the low-calorie beer segment. Earlier this year, the company launched Da Shootz, a 4 percent ABV, 99-calorie pilsner with 4.2 grams of carbs.

Oregon-based Deschutes is also currently developing a range of low- and no-alcohol offerings that it hopes will appeal to a growing number of consumers who are moderating or abstaining from booze – 52 percent of beer drinkers are making efforts to reduce their consumption of alcohol, market research firm Nielsen said.

Chasing Zero Proof

Perhaps the biggest signal that craft breweries were pivoting toward more functional beers came in February, when Sierra Nevada Brewing Company made its first-ever acquisition, buying San Francisco-based Sufferfest Beer Company.

Sufferfest – a term used to describe an extended endurance endeavor, such as a race or a hard workout – was launched in 2016 by Caitlin Looney Landesberg, a former marketing executive at fitness app Strava. The company makes gluten-reduced beers made with ingredients such as bee pollen and sodium and markets to endurance athletes. Many of its beer names – Shakeout Blonde Ale and Taper IPA – draw inspiration from the running world.

Speaking to BevNET, Landesberg said she believes a growing number of younger consumers are gravitating toward “better-for-you” alcohol offerings because they’re seeking transparent products, and they’ve been conditioned to read nutrition facts labels. She argues, the beer category has struggled to keep pace with the broader food and beverage marketplace trend toward healthier snacks and drinks that boast fewer ingredients with more functional benefits.

“There was literally nothing on the market for me,” she said of the impetus to launch Sufferfest. “Macro brands didn’t get me. Cider was too sugary. There were brands I grew up with and revered as a more informed millennial, and I thought there should be the ‘Clif Bar’ of beer.”

As Landesberg points out, Sufferfest’s early success can be partly attributed to the broader consumer shift toward “better-for-you” products. According to the Bump Williams Consulting Company (BWC), 10 of the top 25 “growth” brands in beer tout some kind of benefit – fewer calories, lower carbs, less alcohol, or gluten-free ingredients.

And, according to Nielsen, Americans spent $207 billion on “transparent” food and beverage products in 2018. At the same time, 25 percent of beer drinkers are more interested in consuming alcoholic beverages that were produced with wellness in mind versus “a couple years ago,” the firm told BevNET.

All of this has left most major beer companies angling for a piece of the beer market that is still hard to quantify.

Heineken plans to spend $50 million to promote its alcohol-free 0.0 product. Pabst Brewing has also developed low- and no-alcohol line extensions of its flagship brand, and FIFCO USA, formerly North American Breweries, last year launched an uncarbonated 4.5 percent ABV spiked water called Pura Still.

Hybrids

In recent years, dozens of large malt beverage manufacturers and smaller regional craft beer producers have rushed into a crowded hard seltzer category – one that now accounts for 1.3 percent of total off-premise beer sales. The big breweries have bought or developed their own, as well.

Meanwhile, there’s another faction of craft producers vying for a slice: kombucha makers. “Hard kombucha” producers such as San Diego’s JuneShine and Boochcraft, among others, have emerged as serious contenders in the fight for health-conscious consumers’ dollars.

Both companies have made significant investments in production capacity, and they are among an emerging group of entrepreneurs – including Kevita founder Bill Moses, who recently launched Flying Embers Organic Hard Kombucha – who are convinced a large swath of drinkers will eventually seek out alcoholic products with more functional benefits, such as probiotics.

“We’ve had to jump into this with some assumptions,” Forrest Dein, the co-founder of JuneShine Hard Kombucha, told BevNET. “It’s all about being honest and transparent, which is bigger than the products themselves. It’s a macro trend.”

JuneShine, which recently completed a capital raise and acquired the original 24,000 sq. ft. Ballast Point Brewing facility, is betting that more consumers will seek out alcohol products matching the level of transparency that many food and beverage companies currently provide.

Sales of “clean label” food and beverage products are outpacing conventionally labeled products, according to Nielsen. “Simple” products with fewer than 10 ingredients listed on their labels are growing at 1.3 percent, while “clean” products are growing at 4.3 percent, according to the firm.

“The alcohol space is a bit antiquated,” said Dein. “It hasn’t evolved as fast as the food segment. Consumers want to know the ingredients, and they want there to be some functional benefit.”

For more proof Dein and other entrepreneurial beverage makers see opportunity in transparency, look no further than Willie’s Superbrew, which describes its products as a hybrid cider-seltzer-kombucha. On the company’s website, the first thing you’ll see is a message that reads: “It is absurd that alcohol packaging doesn’t include nutrition facts or ingredients. We believe we deserve to know what we’re drinking.”

Ingredients panels notwithstanding, it’s still early days for hard kombucha makers. According to data from IRI, off-premise dollar sales of alcoholic kombucha were up 179 percent, to $3.9 million, during the 52-week period ending February 17, 2019.

The largest hard kombucha brand in the set is Boochcraft, with about 53 percent of the market share by dollars. The next largest brand is Kyla Hard Kombucha, which is made by Full Sail Brewing. A-B is also playing in the hard kombucha space, with its 4.4 percent ABV Kombrewcha brand.

Beyond “functional” craft beer, boozy seltzer water and higher-proof kombucha, there’s also been an uptick in the development of low-calorie, gluten-free products, such as spritzers and sessionable wine, that larger companies are beginning to test market.

In January, A-B, via its Virtue Cider brand, launched a line of cider-based spritz beverages called Mezzo Spritz. The first product, a blood orange flavor, checks in at 3.5 percent ABV and 80 calories.

A-B, via its ZX Ventures incubator, is also testing two other low-calorie products. Saturday Session wine checks in at 5.5 percent ABV and 100 calories, while “b,” a gluten-free beverage made with water, honey and fruit, contains 100 calories at 3.5 percent ABV.

Similarly, MillerCoors has launched a line of 100-calorie, 8.4 oz. canned wine spritzers called Movo, as well as a line of sessionable alcoholic beverages called “Cape Line.” The latter also contains 100 calories or fewer, per 12 oz. serving.

Even Craft Brew Alliance (CBA), which is 31.3 percent owned by Anheuser-Busch, has created a business unit, called the pH Experiment, that is specifically tasked with innovating around non-traditional alcoholic beverages that play on the fringes of the beer category.

“Our goal is to provide long-term, sustainable growth for CBA,” Karmen Olson, general manager of the pH Experiment, said.

The division’s first product is Pre aperitivo spritz, which checks in at 6.6 percent ABV, contains 160 calories, 1 gram of sugar and 7 grams of carbohydrates.

At the end of the day, after all of the calories and carbohydrates have been counted, it’s clear the beer industry has shifted its focus toward providing drinkers with a variety of so-called guilt-free alcoholic beverage options.

The question, as always, is whether consumers will pull these products off the shelf. Time – or perhaps waistlines – will tell.

Editor’s note: This article appeared in the March/April issue of BevNET Magazine.

Outer Aisle products make it super easy (and tasty!) to add healthy food to your diet – Guilty Eats

Enlightened Ice Cream ‘All that and a bag of chips’ review by Jeremy Melendez

Is Burger King open on Easter Sunday, 2019? by Callum Gunn

Not many people see about cauliflower and think about how delicious it is and run to buy some. That is, until Outer Aisle entered the game.

Yes, we may be Guilty Eats, but in order to shamelessly be able to indulge in all the fattening and sugar-packed goodies we want, we have to keep ourselves healthy. Nowadays, that’s not easy to do, not with all these tasty treats and meals we see daily, but Outer Aisle is making it easy for us to keep up with our favorite lifestyle.

Outer Aisle is the creator of cauliflower based bread-alternative that is made with only four ingredients and no filler flours. The ingredients are: cage-free eggs, parmesan cheese, cauliflower, and nutritional yeast. This makes the products Keto-friendly.

The company also recently launched two new flavors: Jalapeno and Italian flavored sandwich thins and pizza crusts.

What exactly can you create with these? Just about anything you’d like! Outer Aisle sent a box of these my way, both the small sandwich thins and the pizza crusts. While I couldn’t think of anything other than pizza to create on the large one, the sandwich wraps are perfect for substituting taco shells and regular tortillas.

My favorite meal with these was  breakfast, which I used the sandwich thins to create an egg and sausage burrito! Does that sorta break the healthy rules? Probably. Depends on the food you use. But tell me Outer Aisle isn’t a lot more healthy than a regular tortilla? Also, only one of these bread-substitution thins is enough to leave you full (but not overstuffed) and satisfied.

The taste: Yes, I won’t lie, they taste different, especially if you aren’t into cauliflower. But unlike other similar products I’ve tried, Outer Aisle doesn’t have an after taste or a cardboard-like texture. Best of all, you’re left happy and full until your next meal, rather than pack on the calories and make you sluggish from how much you ate. If you’re searching for something with a little more kick to their flavor, try the jalapeno sandwich thins. They aren’t too spicy, but just with enough zest for you to detect the flavor. My favorite, though, are the Italian sandwich thins!

Next: Wendy’s fiery and icy deal is perfect for GoT Sundays

Where can you get some? Outer Aisle sandwich thins and pizza crusts are available on Amazon and select Whole Foods in major markets. Visit Outer Aisle’s store locator online to find a store with their products near you!

What’s your go-to healthy meal and snack! Share with us in the comments!

FYI-Food: New brunch, spring menus, motherly chocolates – Naples Daily News

Catch brunch

Naples Grande Beach Resort’s own The Catch of The Pelican restaurant now serves weekend brunch 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

Favorites include a Bloody Mary Bar with more than 75 unique toppings; a Mimosa Bar with eight different base options like watermelon and white cranberry alongside fresh toppings including fruits and spices; and a Cereal Bar with more than 10 bases including whole milk, coconut milk, Baileys or prosecco, and toppings including peanut butter, chocolate chips, dried fruit and M&M’s.

The brunch menu includes short rib and eggs, an open-face Wagyu burger, banana pancakes, chicken and falafel waffle, creme brulee-stuffed French toast, a crab Benedict, Caprese avocado toast, a tropical acai bowl and a seafood tower with eight poached shrimp, eight oysters, two Maine lobster tails and tuna poke.

Each table will get a basket that plays off the traditional bread basket but features classic throwback snacks that everyone remembers such as homemade Twinkies, Ho-Ho’s and Fig Newtons. For those who pride themselves on having “the camera eat” before they do, tagged photos on social media of decorated Bloody Mary and Mimosa creations will be entered into a contest with the chance to win a future brunch for four.

Naples Grande Beach Resort is at 475 Seagate Drive in North Naples. For more information or restaurant reservations call 800-577-1124 or go to NaplesGrande.com/dining/catch-of-the-pelican.

Tour of Italy wine dinner

Angelina’s Ristorante is hosting its Tour of Italy wine dinner and pairing event at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 17, at the local restaurant in Bonita Springs.

The flavor adventure includes authentic Italian varietals paired in five courses with Executive Chef Ryan Fredstrom’s menu creations presented by in-house wine director and sommelier Dinah Leach alongside special guest David Snyder, direct import manager of Terroir Selections.

The menu includes chilled shrimp salad with a sweet lemon mayonnaise and sliced oranges; baked halibut with basil and almond pesto with a white bean puree; veal meatballs with fresh house-made pasta, sautéed Swiss chard and Parmesan; braised lamb shoulder over creamy polenta with an herbed gremolata; and biscotti with espresso.

Tickets are $99 per person, excluding tax & gratuity. Seating is limited so reservations are required and must be placed by phone, 239-390-3187. 

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Angelina’s is near Coconut Point at 24041 S. Tamiami Trail, Bonita Springs. Call 239-390-3187 or go to AngelinasBonitaSprings.com.

Keto-friendly appetizer

A new starter at True Food Kitchen is keto-approved and gluten-free. The Indonesian-inspired seared chicken satay appetizer features three skewers of achiote-marinated grilled chicken served with a side of pumpkin seed salsa and Persian cucumbers. The pumpkin seed salsa is a combination of pumpkin seeds, tomato, garlic, jalapeño and other herbs and spices.

The nearest True Food is in Waterside Shops in Naples. For more information call 239-431-4580 or go to TrueFoodKitchen.com/Naples.

Hello Spring menu

Fresh from the icy waters off the coast of the Last Frontier comes one of Seasons 52’s most popular spring dishes, wild Alaska halibut. The seafood entrée is oak-fire grilled and served with a roasted zucchini-potato mash and roasted pepper chutney made from fresh whole produce.

The dish is part of the three-course, limited-time Hello Spring menu available until May 26. Choose an appetizer, entrée and Mini Indulgence dessert for $29.95.

Seasons 52 in North Naples is at 8930 U.S. 41 N. Call 239-594-8852 or go to Seasons52.com.

Seasonal menu

Carrrabba’s Italian Grill has introduced a spring seasonal specials menu with entrees such as Tuscan-grilled lamb chops, lemon cream linguine and Mahi Wulfe, lightly breaded and wood-grilled mahi mahi topped with artichokes, sun-dried tomatoes and a house-made basil lemon butter sauce.

The menu includes a classics combination appetizer with hand-breaded calamari, mozzarella marinara and three-cheese stuffed mushrooms; and limoncello bread pudding for dessert. Cocktails include Berry Breeze featuring Tito’s Handmade Vodka shaken with blackberry, raspberry and pineapple; and strawberry rosé sangria with Belleruche Rosé, Absolut Vodka, St-Germain Elderflower liqueur, fresh strawberries and a squeeze of lemon.

For more information and regional locations of Carrabba’s go to Cararabbas.com.

Motherly sweets

French silk, Oreo cheesecake and rum cake highlight Norman Love Confections’ 2019 Mother’s Day Collection, a limited-edition selection of ultra-premium, handcrafted chocolates created to satisfy the refined palate of mothers everywhere.

“We created an exclusive line of premier, heart-shaped chocolates just for mom,” said Norman Love, founder and owner of Norman Love Confections. “Chocolate is a traditional gift that never goes out of style, and our 2019 Mother’s Day Collection is the perfect way to show mom she is loved and appreciated.”

The 10-piece collection of artisanal chocolates is split evenly between popular pie flavors (apple, banana cream, coconut cream, French silk and lemon meringue) and divine cakes (carrot, coffee, Oreo cheesecake, pineapple upside-down and rum).

The 2019 Mother’s Day Collection will be offered from April 29 through Mother’s Day, May 12, at Norman Love Confections’ chocolate salons in Fort Myers, Naples and Estero, as well as online at NormanLoveConfections.com. A 10-piece box is offered at $26, the 15-piece box is available for $35 and the 25-piece box costs $52.50. Additional chocolates and specialty gifts are available in store and online, including Mystery Boxes that feature themed assortments of chocolate treats by delivery. For more information call 239-561-7215.

Email dining promotions by the Friday before the Wednesday publication dates to [email protected] Please include the venue’s address, telephone number and website.

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Twitter’s Jack Dorsey says he skips meals on Saturdays — dietitians call it billionaire baloney – MarketWatch

Jack Dorsey doesn’t eat much. And he wants you to know about it.

The CEO and co-founder of Twitter TWTR, +0.99%  and Square SQ, -1.18% discussed his eating habits during a recent appearance on a podcast hosted by fitness entrepreneur Ben Greenfield. Dorsey described his experiences trying different diets — including strict veganism and the Paleo diet — before focusing attention on his current eating plan.

‘I’ll go from Friday ’til Sunday. I won’t have dinner on Friday. I won’t have dinner or any meal on Saturday.’

—Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey

“For the past two years, I only have dinner,” Dorsey said. He eats between 6:30 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. The meal typically consists of a protein and lots of leafy greens. Sometimes he adds in another vegetable — asparagus or Brussels sprouts for instance. Dessert is usually mixed berries, or maybe dark chocolate. He also drinks wine.

On top of this limited, regimented diet, Dorsey also says he engages in longer fasts, skipping all meals on Saturdays. “The other thing I’ve been playing with recently is not just a single day but doing weekends,” he told Greenfield. “I’ll go from Friday ’til Sunday. I won’t have dinner on Friday. I won’t have dinner or any meal on Saturday. And the first time I’ll eat will be Sunday evening.”

It’s not clear whether Dorsey’s dieting claims are merely designed to burnish the eccentric “thinking outside the box” credentials of a Silicon Valley billionaire. It wouldn’t be the first time a public figure claimed to have unusual habits that others would find too difficult to maintain: The late Margaret Thatcher, the former British Prime Minister, was famously reported to only need four hours of sleep, which helped promote her reputation as “The Iron Lady.”

Don’t miss: This is the right way to eat carbs

In 2019, diets are becoming more unusual as people look for ways to improve their performance, stay healthy and, well, lose weight. Dieting runs the gamut from macro dieters who count every nutrient and calorie, to people who buy low-calorie meal plans consisting of soups and smoothies to the low-carb Atkins Diet and high-fat Keto Diet. There’s no shortage of pay-to-play online diet plans and diet books for those desperately searching for a way to lose weight — and keep it off.

Consumers are searching for that ‘secret sauce’ to living their best life

Dorsey’s reported diet plan may encourage consumers to believe there is a “secret sauce” to living their best life. People are willing to spend money in an attempt to find that perfect diet and, if that doesn’t work, the next diet that promises to answer all their problems. The U.S. weight loss industry was estimated to be worth $70.3 billion in 2018, up from $64 billion in 2014, according to market research firm Marketdata. Globally, the industry is estimated to be worth $3.7 trillion.

People are also choosing foods and meal times that they believe will help their mood and concentration. Much like the “biohackers” of Silicon Valley, the weight-loss industry is rebranding itself to move quietly away from the pressures and stigma associated with weight loss. The company long known as WeightWatchers rebranded itself last fall as WW International WTW, +5.42%  as a part of a shift away from “weight” to “wellness.”

When Weight Watchers began in the early 1960s, the company did not recommend skipping meals.

When it began in the early 1960s, WW International did not recommend skipping meals. “Dieting is so focused on what you lose … and what we were hearing from our members is that wellness is about what you gain,” Gail Tifford, WW’s chief brand officer, told MarketWatch last year.

WW’s spokeswoman Oprah Winfrey invested in the company in 2015 and the stock soared in the months following that announcement. However, the company’s stock has tumbled 72% over the 12 months. (Comparatively, the Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA, -0.10%  and the S&P 500 SPX, -0.06%  are up 7.9% and 9.1%, respectively, over the same period.)

Changing consumer sentiment is driving WW’s — and the weight loss industry’s — recent woes, analysts say. The share of people who are dieting has shrunk in recent years as people’s attitudes change towards health and the roles that food and diet play.

Is ‘biohacking’ a term that re-brands unhealthy eating habits for men?

This isn’t the first time Dorsey has discussed his unusual eating habits. In the past, he has posted to Twitter soliciting feedback about others’ experiences with intermittent fasting. “If this was any female celebrity, people would be jumping all over her saying she has an eating disorder,” said Abby Langer, a registered dietician based in Toronto, Canada. (Twitter declined to comment on Dorsey’s diet. Square did not immediately return a request for comment.)

Some have labelled Dorsey’s diet as problematic, but some coverage has taken a more aspirational bent. A CNBC article on Dorsey’s podcast appearance was originally titled “Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 biohacks: From no food all weekend to ice baths.” (The article now carries a new headline, replacing the word “biohacks” with the phrase “‘wellness habits.”)

Dorsey is not the only person in Silicon Valley to engage in extreme dieting. It’s popular among workers, especially men.

But Dorsey is far from the only person in Silicon Valley to engage in extreme dieting. Intermittent fasting has been popular among workers (especially men) in the tech sector for years. Key to the diet’s appeal is placing it in the framework of so-called “biohacking,” an attempt to boost mental acuity and productivity.

Besides fasting, self-proclaimed biohackers also track vitals such as their blood sugar level and body composition, restrict their meals to beverages like Soylent and take supplements.

If Dorsey’s claims about his extreme dieting is true, Langer says such “biohacks” are not “wellness,” and not eating on the weekend is not representative of a healthy diet. “This whole biohacking thing is getting more and more crazy,” she said.

Dorsey tweeted in January: “Been playing with fasting for some time. I do a 22-hour fast daily (dinner only), and recently did a 3 day water fast. Biggest thing I notice is how much time slows down. The day feels so much longer when not broken up by breakfast/lunch/dinner. Any one else have this experience?”

Because successful men like Dorsey are promoting extreme dieting on social media, it’s gaining a wider foothold.

Because men like Dorsey, who have achieved success in business, are promoting these behaviors on social media, they are gaining a foothold. “When the general public sees men like that who are promoting a process like intermittent fasting, they say this clearly works, it’s endorsed by the 1%,” said Lindsay Kite, co-director of Beauty Redefined, a nonprofit devoted to promoting positive body image.

Yet the exact behaviors Dorsey and others are engaging are not considered healthy lifestyle choices among most health professionals and dietitians. The National Eating Disorder Association lists skipping meals, only eating small portions of food at regular meals and engaging in fad diets that cut out entire food groups as common symptoms of an eating disorder.

Also see: Soylent’s meal-replacement beverages are now in Walmart — but are they affordable?

“Wealthy white guys are re-branding something girls have been doing for decades,” Kite said. “We don’t need starvation and deprivation re-branded and sold back to us as biohacking. And we don’t need men to join us in deeply troubled relationships with food.”

While everyone faces pressure to be thin, Kite argues that women and girls bear the brunt of those expectations. And for women in the limelight that’s especially true.

‘Wealthy white guys are re-branding something girls have been doing for decades.’

—Lindsay Kite, co-director of Beauty Redefined

Famous women have also faced accusations of having eating disorders when that’s not the case. Actress and “Modern Family” star Sarah Hyland has debunked claims that she is anorexic. In fact, she has said kidney issues led her to lose weight. Female actresses are regularly splashed across magazines and newspaper tabloids with headlines critiquing their bodies.

Oscar nominee Gabourey Sidibe has been outspoken about her frustrations with receiving kudos from fans and people on social media for losing weight. “It just annoys me because I’m just, like, don’t congratulate me on that. If you’re going to congratulate me on my weight loss, also congratulate me every time I pee,” Sidibe told online lifestyle news outlet Refinery29.

Men appear to suffer from eating disorders at a lower rate than women

Research has shown that nearly 1% of women have suffered from anorexia at some point in their lives, as compared with 0.3% of men. Research has suggested that men make up of just 10% of people who are treated for eating disorders, but also make up 40% of those who are diagnosed with binge eating.

Studies suggest that nearly 1% of women and 0.3% of men have suffered from anorexia.

For those who are struggling with disordered eating, help is available. The National Eating Disorder Association has a helpline, 1-800-931-2237, which people can call to find free resources available in their area. And organizations such as Project Heal provide scholarships to those looking to get treatment.

Society treats men and women’s bodies differently, Kite added. Women are often raised with expectations to look a certain way, and many of the women who struggle with eating disorders do so in silence. That Dorsey and others say they focus on diet not as a tool for weight loss, but as a way to be more mentally focused or productive, is not surprising, she added.

Yet for all their talk of how fasting is good for your mental faculties, the subtext is clear: It keeps you thin. “If those men looked different, no one would be cheering,” Kite said. “This is popular because of our cultural obsession with thinness.”

Social media has become ground zero for negative body image

There’s an added irony that Dorsey is endorsing behaviors associated with eating disorders, given the role that social media now plays in promoting these unhealthy habits, experts say. In recent years, sites like Instagram FB, +0.31%  and Pinterest have been forced to grapple with the proliferation of content designed to encourage eating disorders.

Instagram, for instance, has been forced to ban and moderate specific hashtags that are used to share “pro-ana” (pro anorexia) content, including #thinspiration and #thighgap. Despite these efforts, pro-eating disorder content commonly evades social media sites’ filters. Research has also shown that social-media use is linked with body image concerns.

‘A healthy diet is also about people’s attitude toward food and how they’re eating.’

—Abby Langer, registered dietician

Complicating matters when it comes to fad diets like intermittent fasting is the fact that some research — and news articles based on those studies — have suggested they could be useful tools in achieving healthy weight loss.

But as experts note, the studies providing leverage for fad diets is far from conclusive. Many of these studies have been performed with mice or rats, not with humans. And even the studies done with people are limited: Many have small sample sizes that are not representative of the broader public and take place for too short of a period of time to prove whether these diets work in the long-term.

There are also some who have argued that weight loss may be a fool’s errand — not only not achievable for most people, but also a dangerous pursuit.

One way to start is by looking at what you should add to your diet — many studies have shown people don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables — rather than focusing on what to eliminate. And before starting any new eating approach, Lang encouraged consumers to get a second opinion from a doctor, registered dietician or psychologist.

There are ways to shift one’s approach to food and pursue a healthier lifestyle. “People think that a healthy diet is only what they put in their mouths,” Langer said. “But a healthy diet is also about people’s attitude toward food and how they’re eating.”

Get a daily roundup of the top reads in personal finance delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to MarketWatch’s free Personal Finance Daily newsletter. Sign up here.

Asian, Vegan, Or Keto: Seder Menus Are Leaning Trendy – Forward

Is your seder leaning Asian, vegan, or keto this year? A new report says you’re not alone.

Experiments are trumping tradition at many Passover tables, according to Tastewise, a Tel Aviv startup that analyzes social-media posts for “food intelligence” and trend data.

Among the findings in Tastewise’s Easter and Passover Food Trends Report:

Instead of relying on Ashkenazi comfort food, Jewish cooks are trying “new fusions” with Mexican and Japanese influences, swapping shank bones for vegan options like beets on the seder plate, and sharing “supergreens” like wakame instead of bitter herbs.

Part of the shift stems from social media itself, said Tastewise founder Alon Chen, a former Google exec. “Today innovation today comes from everywhere. Even an amateur home chef or a small restaurant can inspire the world to make almost every dish with rainbow colors,” he told the Forward in an e-mail. Food photos on Instagram, for example, can have wide-ranging ripple effects on cooking habits everywhere.

Tastewise analyzes images, posts, and recipes on social-media platforms “to tap into culinary predilections to understand consumer behavior and accurately predict trends.” The six-month-old company’s clients include restaurants, hospitality groups, and food brands, including Pure Grey, a food and beverage consulting firm owned by Marriott International, Chen said. The firm’s database also includes more than 150,000 restaurant menus.

Chen said his own family’s Shabbat dinners inspired the launch of Tastewise. “Before each meal, my mother asks us, ‘What are your dietary requirements this week?’ If my own family couldn’t keep track of each other’s diets, I realized that restaurants and food brands must have a much more difficult time keeping up with food trends,” he said. “Tastewise was built to bring data and insights to an industry that’s hungry for innovation.

The Forward asked Chen for a Tastewise take on Jewish food in general, and he obligingly crunched the data.

“While Jewish holidays bring families together around more traditional Jewish food like gefilte fish, chopped liver, and knishes, the growth of these dishes in restaurants menus is very small compared to other more healthy Mediterranean/Israeli food,” he said.

For example, gefilte fish growth in restaurants menus week over week is 0.83%, corned beef is 0.87%, chopped liver is 0.25%, knishes is 0.78% and pastrami is 0.82%) — while hummus is 1.53%, tahini is 1.62% and zhoug is 3.72%, according to Tastewise.

Shakshuka, Chen noted, is growing by 4.23% on restaurants menus, and green shakshuka “is enjoying a 200% growth on social mentions year over year.”


You heard it here first.

This story “Asian, Vegan, Or Keto: Seder Menus Are Leaning Trendy” was written by Michael Kaminer.

Cold Brew Bar Coffeehouse Opens at Atlanta Dairies on Memorial Drive, Reynoldstown, Atlanta – Eater Atlanta

Dairies Coffeehouse and Cold Brew Bar is open at Atlanta Dairies on Memorial Drive in Reynoldstown. The shop, which opened over the weekend, offers a multitude of coffee and tea drinks, along with a 14-tap cold brew bar.

It’s part of Thrive Farmers, a company which partners directly with coffee farmers and small coffee farms throughout the world to offer sustainable beans to shops and businesses.

Cold Brew’s menu is broken down by cold and hot drinks, and includes frappes, milkshakes, cold-press juices and smoothies, and drinks on tap like the nitro oak milk or matcha lattes and a sparkling Arnold Palmer as well as hot coffee beverages, teas, and drinking chocolates.

A “functional beverages” category lists keto coffee made with grassfed butter and MCT oil and a vanilla rose latte consisting of beetroot powder, vanilla cardamom, rose water, and coconut milk.

Food here leans “clean” with several vegan and vegetarian dishes, a selection of paleo, keto, smoothie, and yogurt bowls, along with toasts topped with smoked salmon, grilled corn and avocado, and goat cheese, fruit, and herbs. Korean pork sliders, a crushed egg and pimento cheese sandwich, and a fancy grilled cheese with Sweet Grass Dairy green hill cheese, mascarpone, and strawberry-balsamic glaze on cranberry walnut bread are among the heartier options.

Cold Brew Bar
Cold Brew Bar
Cold Brew Bar
Cold Brew Bar

A second location opens at The Collective food hall at CODA near Georgia Tech in Midtown later this year.

Eater Atlanta reached out for further details.

Cold Brew Bar will soon be joined by a second location of Three Taverns Brewery, a collaborative diner venture between Big Citizen restaurant group and King of Pops called Wonderkid, and a concert hall with a rooftop bar from the owners of Variety Playhouse.

Sunday – Thursday, 6:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 6:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Parking found on the second level of the deck between Alta Dairies apartments and Atlanta Dairies.

777 Memorial Drive SE, Suite 103A, Atlanta. coldbrewbar.com.

Video: Geneticist Pamela Ronald breaks down basics of GMO safety, labeling – Genetic Literacy Project

Name a food preference and you can likely find items in the supermarket aisles to accommodate your wants and needs: low-fat, zero fat, low carb, gluten-free, organic, vegetarian-friendly, vegan, Paleo, Keto. The list goes on.

But no label stirs up quite as much debate as the one bearing these three letters: GMO.

In case you didn’t already know, those letters stand for genetically-modified organisms, referring to organisms — plants in particular — that are biologically engineered with genetic traits from other organisms that wouldn’t cross in nature.

While you won’t see too many products labeled as containing genetically-modified ingredients, you will see plenty proclaiming to be “Non-GMO”.

Related article:  GMO crops still ‘sticking point’ as US-China trade deal moves toward completion

Dr. Pamela Ronald sees the “Non-GMO” label as just another “label that people are selling.”

“GMO is meaningless and ‘Non-GMO’ is even more meaningless,” she says. “I prefer labels that are anchored to some kind of meaningful science and inspection.”

Ronald is a proponent of a new label that is coming soon in the U.S. It’s the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard that begins coming into place on January 1, 2020.

[embedded content]

Original video: How much do you know about genetically modified food and Non-GMO labels?

Twitter’s Jack Dorsey says he skips meals on weekends, but dietitians strongly advise against it – MarketWatch

Jack Dorsey doesn’t eat much. And he wants you to know about it.

The CEO and co-founder of Twitter TWTR, +1.45%  and Square SQ, +0.92% discussed his eating habits during a recent appearance on a podcast hosted by fitness entrepreneur Ben Greenfield. Dorsey described his experiences trying different diets — including strict veganism and the Paleo diet — before focusing attention on his current eating plan.

‘I’ll go from Friday ’til Sunday. I won’t have dinner on Friday. I won’t have dinner or any meal on Saturday.’

—Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey

“For the past two years, I only have dinner,” Dorsey said. He eats between 6:30 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. The meal typically consists of a protein and lots of leafy greens. Sometimes he adds in another vegetable — asparagus or Brussels sprouts for instance. Dessert is usually mixed berries, or maybe dark chocolate. He also drinks wine.

On top of this limited, regimented diet, Dorsey also says he engages in longer fasts. “The other thing I’ve been playing with recently is not just a single day but doing weekends,” he told Greenfield. “I’ll go from Friday ’til Sunday. I won’t have dinner on Friday. I won’t have dinner or any meal on Saturday. And the first time I’ll eat will be Sunday evening.”

It’s not clear whether Dorsey’s dieting claims are merely designed to burnish the eccentric “thinking outside the box” credentials of a Silicon Valley billionaire. It wouldn’t be the first time a public figure claimed to have unusual habits that others would find too difficult to maintain: The late Margaret Thatcher, the former British Prime Minister, was famously reported to only need four hours of sleep, which helped promote her reputation as “The Iron Lady.”

Don’t miss: This is the right way to eat carbs

In 2019, diets are becoming more unusual as people look for ways to improve their performance, stay healthy and, well, lose weight. Dieting runs the gamut from macro dieters who count every nutrient and calorie, to people who buy low-calorie meal plans consisting of soups and smoothies to the low-carb Atkins Diet and high-fat Keto Diet. There’s no shortage of pay-to-play online diet plans and diet books for those desperately searching for a way to lose weight — and keep it off.

Consumers are searching for that ‘secret sauce’ to living their best life

Dorsey’s reported diet plan may encourage consumers to believe there is a “secret sauce” to living their best life. People are willing to spend money in an attempt to find that perfect diet and, if that doesn’t work, the next diet that promises to answer all their problems. The U.S. weight loss industry was estimated to be worth $70.3 billion in 2018, up from $64 billion in 2014, according to market research firm Marketdata. Globally, the industry is estimated to be worth $3.7 trillion.

People are also choosing foods and meal times that they believe will help their mood and concentration. Much like the “biohackers” of Silicon Valley, the weight-loss industry is rebranding itself to move quietly away from the pressures and stigma associated with weight loss. The company long known as WeightWatchers rebranded itself last fall as WW International WTW, +3.67%  as a part of a shift away from “weight” to “wellness.”

When Weight Watchers began in the early 1960s, the company did not recommend skipping meals.

When it began in the early 1960s, WW International did not recommend skipping meals. “Dieting is so focused on what you lose … and what we were hearing from our members is that wellness is about what you gain,” Gail Tifford, WW’s chief brand officer, told MarketWatch last year.

WW’s spokeswoman Oprah Winfrey invested in the company in 2015 and the stock soared in the months following that announcement. However, the company’s stock has tumbled 72% over the 12 months. (Comparatively, the Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA, -0.26%  and the S&P 500 SPX, -0.18%  are up 7.9% and 9.1%, respectively, over the same period.)

Changing consumer sentiment is driving WW’s — and the weight loss industry’s — recent woes, analysts say. The share of people who are dieting has shrunk in recent years as people’s attitudes change towards health and the roles that food and diet play.

Is ‘biohacking’ a term that re-brands unhealthy eating habits for men?

This isn’t the first time Dorsey has discussed his unusual eating habits. In the past, he has posted to Twitter soliciting feedback about others’ experiences with intermittent fasting. “If this was any female celebrity, people would be jumping all over her saying she has an eating disorder,” said Abby Langer, a registered dietician based in Toronto, Canada. (Twitter declined to comment on Dorsey’s diet. Square did not immediately return a request for comment.)

Some have labelled Dorsey’s diet as problematic, but some coverage has taken a more aspirational bent. A CNBC article on Dorsey’s podcast appearance was originally titled “Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 biohacks: From no food all weekend to ice baths.” (The article now carries a new headline, replacing the word “biohacks” with the phrase “‘wellness habits.”)

Dorsey is not the only person in Silicon Valley to engage in extreme dieting. It’s popular among workers, especially men.

But Dorsey is far from the only person in Silicon Valley to engage in extreme dieting. Intermittent fasting has been popular among workers (especially men) in the tech sector for years. Key to the diet’s appeal is placing it in the framework of so-called “biohacking,” an attempt to boost mental acuity and productivity.

Besides fasting, self-proclaimed biohackers also track vitals such as their blood sugar level and body composition, restrict their meals to beverages like Soylent and take supplements.

If Dorsey’s claims about his extreme dieting is true, Langer says such “biohacks” are not “wellness,” and not eating on the weekend is not representative of a healthy diet. “This whole biohacking thing is getting more and more crazy,” she said.

Dorsey tweeted in January: “Been playing with fasting for some time. I do a 22-hour fast daily (dinner only), and recently did a 3 day water fast. Biggest thing I notice is how much time slows down. The day feels so much longer when not broken up by breakfast/lunch/dinner. Any one else have this experience?”

Because successful men like Dorsey are promoting extreme dieting on social media, it’s gaining a wider foothold.

Because men like Dorsey, who have achieved success in business, are promoting these behaviors on social media, they are gaining a foothold. “When the general public sees men like that who are promoting a process like intermittent fasting, they say this clearly works, it’s endorsed by the 1%,” said Lindsay Kite, co-director of Beauty Redefined, a nonprofit devoted to promoting positive body image.

Yet the exact behaviors Dorsey and others are engaging are not considered healthy lifestyle choices among most health professionals and dietitians. The National Eating Disorder Association lists skipping meals, only eating small portions of food at regular meals and engaging in fad diets that cut out entire food groups as common symptoms of an eating disorder.

Also see: Soylent’s meal-replacement beverages are now in Walmart — but are they affordable?

“Wealthy white guys are re-branding something girls have been doing for decades,” Kite said. “We don’t need starvation and deprivation re-branded and sold back to us as biohacking. And we don’t need men to join us in deeply troubled relationships with food.”

While everyone faces pressure to be thin, Kite argues that women and girls bear the brunt of those expectations. And for women in the limelight that’s especially true.

‘Wealthy white guys are re-branding something girls have been doing for decades.’

—Lindsay Kite, co-director of Beauty Redefined

Famous women have also faced accusations of having eating disorders when that’s not the case. Actress and “Modern Family” star Sarah Hyland has debunked claims that she is anorexic. In fact, she has said kidney issues led her to lose weight. Female actresses are regularly splashed across magazines and newspaper tabloids with headlines critiquing their bodies.

Oscar nominee Gabourey Sidibe has been outspoken about her frustrations with receiving kudos from fans and people on social media for losing weight. “It just annoys me because I’m just, like, don’t congratulate me on that. If you’re going to congratulate me on my weight loss, also congratulate me every time I pee,” Sidibe told online lifestyle news outlet Refinery29.

Men appear to suffer from eating disorders at a lower rate than women

Research has shown that nearly 1% of women have suffered from anorexia at some point in their lives, as compared with 0.3% of men. Research has suggested that men make up of just 10% of people who are treated for eating disorders, but also make up 40% of those who are diagnosed with binge eating.

Studies suggest that nearly 1% of women and 0.3% of men have suffered from anorexia.

For those who are struggling with disordered eating, help is available. The National Eating Disorder Association has a helpline, 1-800-931-2237, which people can call to find free resources available in their area. And organizations such as Project Heal provide scholarships to those looking to get treatment.

Society treats men and women’s bodies differently, Kite added. Women are often raised with expectations to look a certain way, and many of the women who struggle with eating disorders do so in silence. That Dorsey and others say they focus on diet not as a tool for weight loss, but as a way to be more mentally focused or productive, is not surprising, she added.

Yet for all their talk of how fasting is good for your mental faculties, the subtext is clear: It keeps you thin. “If those men looked different, no one would be cheering,” Kite said. “This is popular because of our cultural obsession with thinness.”

Social media has become ground zero for negative body image

There’s an added irony that Dorsey is endorsing behaviors associated with eating disorders, given the role that social media now plays in promoting these unhealthy habits, experts say. In recent years, sites like Instagram FB, -0.63%  and Pinterest have been forced to grapple with the proliferation of content designed to encourage eating disorders.

Instagram, for instance, has been forced to ban and moderate specific hashtags that are used to share “pro-ana” (pro anorexia) content, including #thinspiration and #thighgap. Despite these efforts, pro-eating disorder content commonly evades social media sites’ filters. Research has also shown that social-media use is linked with body image concerns.

‘A healthy diet is also about people’s attitude toward food and how they’re eating.’

—Abby Langer, registered dietician

Complicating matters when it comes to fad diets like intermittent fasting is the fact that some research — and news articles based on those studies — have suggested they could be useful tools in achieving healthy weight loss.

But as experts note, the studies providing leverage for fad diets is far from conclusive. Many of these studies have been performed with mice or rats, not with humans. And even the studies done with people are limited: Many have small sample sizes that are not representative of the broader public and take place for too short of a period of time to prove whether these diets work in the long-term.

There are also some who have argued that weight loss may be a fool’s errand — not only not achievable for most people, but also a dangerous pursuit.

One way to start is by looking at what you should add to your diet — many studies have shown people don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables — rather than focusing on what to eliminate. And before starting any new eating approach, Lang encouraged consumers to get a second opinion from a doctor, registered dietician or psychologist.

There are ways to shift one’s approach to food and pursue a healthier lifestyle. “People think that a healthy diet is only what they put in their mouths,” Langer said. “But a healthy diet is also about people’s attitude toward food and how they’re eating.”

Get a daily roundup of the top reads in personal finance delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to MarketWatch’s free Personal Finance Daily newsletter. Sign up here.

The curious case of the ‘best’ and ‘ideal’ – The Hindu

Is it a coincidence? The last several social outings and gatherings have veered around animated discussions on the topic of weight loss. Debate on diets has been frequent and passionate, with most people presenting authoritative (almost electoral) views on the right one. ‘Best’, I have discovered, is a favourite adjective when alluding to one’s version of it. Dissenters, be prepared to be challenged. It’s the Battle of ‘Eureka’— as I call it. Many folks are now abreast of diets forms, with keto, intermittent fasting and eating as per dosha/body type (Ayurvedic guidelines) emerging as the trendier ones. Exercise, not surprisingly, doesn’t share the same shelf space. But here too, ‘best’ and ‘ideal’ tend to find their way in. So is there really an ‘ideal’ or ‘best’ way to diet and exercise to lose weight? There are multiple aspects to consider.

Young guy jogging in a park

Young guy jogging in a park  

Know that no two people are identical in the way they process food or exercise

You’ve heard the saying ‘you are what you eat’. There is an oft-missed qualifier to this. It’s not just what you eat. It’s also how you digest and absorb what you eat; what suits your gut, and how your body is able to efficiently extract what it needs to meet all demands placed on it (or not, if you are mainly sedentary!) and eliminate/cleanse the rest. Food works at macro and micro levels. What makes one happy can be misery for another if it doesn’t suit or deliver for them. Not all food intolerances or deficiencies are easy to spot. You could be unknowingly creating a chronic gut environment that hampers nutrition absorption, cellular working and metabolism, which does not allow for easy weight loss (or weight gain). Your diet has to be mindful of this, especially if it rests on one food group excessively.

Recognise change

Our body doesn’t behave the same way over a lifetime. With age, internal and external factors, how the body responds to diet and exercise changes. We need to adapt eating and working-out interventions proactively. It’s true that what works for one may not be as effective for another. It’s also true what worked for you before may not work as well now. The body gets used to a pattern. To stave off plateaus, one needs to shake things up with eating and movement, but sensibly. The ‘ideal’ diet and exercise will thus be what is relevant and effective for you now, without a long-term negative impact.

Understand the bigger challenge

What about the bigger challenge of maintaining a desirable body weight? What happens when you get off the diets? When your body stops responding to exercise? Most of us cannot endlessly be on a diet and devote more time to exercise beyond a point. How many people do we know around us whose life is a story of constant struggle maintaining weight, those who keep getting on and off diets and exercise? Quite a few!

Remember, weight gain usually happens over a period of time due to sustained wrong lifestyle choices (pertaining to food and sedentary habits). The body will need time to reverse negative changes. Lifestyle habits cannot be built with quick-fix or intense approaches. Measures adopted need to be sustainable in the long run and responsive to your physical ability, goals and state of health.

‘Ideal’, unfortunately, is not a timeless reality or a plug-and-play diet-and-exercise routine. It is a dynamic process that requires eating right most of the time and working out smart, based on our changing capacity. It’s what works best for you now and in the long run.

Vani B Pahwa is an ACE-certified Personal Trainer, a certified Cancer Exercise Specialist, a Master Rehab Trainer, a Functional Movement, Barefoot Training Specialist, BarefootRX Rehab Specialist, Foot & Gait Analyst, and a BOSU Personal Trainer. She is also a Mohiniyattam dancer