Keto Diet: Eat This No.1 Keto Friendly Dinner – Azizsalon News

Staying on a keto diet can be difficult, but what if you have lists of Foods to Eat for dinner? With bacon ranch chicken, bacon-wrapped cauliflower, and hearty keto chili, you’ll not only eat healthily, but you’ll lose weight fast.

70% of people on a keto diet finds it hard to make a good dinner choice.

Even if you have the word best keto meal books, you’d still miss out on some things.

Today, you’ll see 1 food that’ll help you lose weight.

However, if you’re busy, and don’t have all the time to make keto friendly meals, then you need weight loss supplement.

It’s cool to also use a weight-loss food delivery service if you don’t want to cook keto-friendly meals yourself.

Recipes for Keto Diet-friendly dinner plans

Here you’ll find the right recipes to make cheesy Bacon Ranch Chicken below.

See Also: Weight Loss Plan: The No.1 Breakfast Meal to Lose Weight Fast

Cheesy Bacon Ranch Chicken

Making this meal is easy, if you truly want to lose weight fast, then you should follow the instructions below to start today.

Ingredients

Keto Diet: Eat This No.1 Keto Friendly Dinner

Once you prepare this, you can serve it 4 times.

  • You need 3 chicken breasts
  • Salt, and Pepper to taste
  • 6 tablespoons ranch dressing
  • 6 slices bacon
  • 4 oz cheddar cheese (115 g)

The preparation is ready, kindly follow the instructions below to start preparing this now.

  1. The first you need to do is to preheat oven to 400˚F (200˚C).
  2. Once that is done, then kindly place chicken breast in a baking dish. You have to properly season your chicken with salt and pepper, so you can get a delicious taste.
  3. Spread 1-2 Tbsp. ranch on each chicken breast.
  4. Layer two slices of bacon on top of each chicken breast.
  5. Top with cheese.
  6. Bake for 40 minutes

We’re always here to help you through your weight loss journey.

If you have questions about how to make keto friendly Cheesy Bacon Ranch Chicken, then leave a comment below.

Not Your Daddy’s Protein – northernexpress.com

How to navigate a protein-mad culture through a progressive — and nutrient-critical — lens.
By Loghan Call | Aug. 10, 2019

There are two major trends in food today: protein and plants. Protein-heavy diets are being promoted in both keto and paleo diets, while billions of dollars are being funneled into the creation of plant-based “meats” such as the Impossible burger and others. 
 
The issue, however, is that both of these paths present valid concerns. Whether you’re eating a significant amount of animal products or consuming highly processed plant-based proteins, these choices impact your health and the environment. 
 
It’s understandable. Branded diets are attractive because they offer an easy list of what to eat and what not to eat. However, if we are to embody optimal health, part of the journey is to understand that our health and well-being is more complex than a simple elimination of certain foods. We must create a foundation for our eating habits that can be applied to any lifestyle. To build that foundation, I tell people to pay attention and, when shopping, preparing, and cooking food, commit to three critical pillars: sourcing, diversity, and moderation. These principles are applicable to any lifestyle and ensure that, regardless of income level, health concerns or diet, that you can make the best choices possible.

SOURCING
Where is your food coming from? Ultimately, the best source is from a local farm that you know and trust. We are incredibly fortunate to live in a region that has an outstanding array of local farmers; they’re critical for sourcing meats or plants. How the farmer works with the land determines whether your body will get the critical nutrients it needs. It also impacts the degradation of the soil or the regeneration of it. Soil health can be a complex topic, but the bottom line is that soil health equals environmental health, which equals human health. Ask the farmers you buy from what soil health practices they are using. Note: Supporting the best, local farming practices isn’t always a financially viable option for everyone. But the next two principles are obtainable within any budget.
 
DIVERSITY
Over the years, the diversity of our food system has shrunk by startling numbers. As the industry grew to provide massive amounts of food for display in supermarkets, the majority of food is grown to meet consumer expectations in terms of size, look, shape, and beauty — often at the expense of taste and nutrients. This has had a significant impact on our health. We need diversity in our diet to receive the spectrum of nutrients and vitamins our bodies need to thrive. 
 
Instead of just grabbing white rice, try barley. Instead of red peppers, give daikon radish a try. If you’re able to shop at a farmers market, ask your farmers for samples of anything you’re not familiar with, and for ideas on how to prepare it. The bottom line is that, with an already slim choice of foods (compared to what nature offers), we are consuming a small percentage of available nutrients due to our desire to stick with what we know. 
 
MODERATION 
Any food in excess isn’t good for our system. If you think about these three principles while shopping, cooking, and eating you’ll start to see patterns and habits. Recognize the foods you are over-consuming and apply the diversity principle on your next shopping trip. Also, recognize that moderation can be — and often is — difficult. Our bodies are addicted to certain foods, and it takes dedication to break the addiction. 
 
With the three principles in mind, it becomes obvious that relying on the same cuts of meat or the newly developed plant proteins isn’t optimal. Want to broaden your diet and nutrient uptake? Here’s three outstanding protein sources you might not have considered:
 
Black Lentils
Unlike green and red lentils, black lentils will hold their shape after cooking (instead of turning to mush). After cooking (around 20–30 minutes on medium boil), rinse them with cold water to keep them from cooking any further. The natural flavor of black lentils is tame, which means that like a piece of meat, the final flavor is up to you. You can use them for all kinds of dishes. I love putting them in salads, one-bowl meals, or adding some cajun seasoning and dropping a scoop in a taco. Another favorite application is to add them into a cucumber salad. Toss together your favorite cucumber salad recipe and add in an equal portion of black lentils for a real boost of protein and nutrients. 
PRICE: Often found for about $1.50 to $3 per pound. One cup uncooked makes four cups cooked.
PROTEIN: They offer a bountiful 18 grams of protein per cooked cup.
COOL FACT: The lentil family is excellent for improving the health of the soil. They are one of the few crops that help with nitrogen fixation, an important aspect of maintaining a healthy balance in soil. 

Amaranth
Most people know about quinoa — now meet its cooler, cheaper mate, amaranth! Amaranth is actually a seed and can grow most anywhere. You’ll often see amaranth in breakfast foods, cereals, and granola. However, there are plenty of ways to utilize amaranth in every meal. 
Here are three tasty ways to use amaranth: One, when cooking any grain, add in 1/4 part amaranth. During the cooking process, the tiny little seeds will stick to the other grains. This eliminates the “stickiness” of the grain if cooked alone, plus adds a different texture along and wonderful health benefits.

Two, you can also puff it! Like corn, amaranth can be puffed and used as a topping on any type of sweet or savory dish. To puff amaranth, heat a pot with no lid but high sides (to prevent amaranth from going everywhere) to medium-high heat. Once hot (about 5 minutes) add amaranth one tablespoon at a time. If your heat is correct, amaranth will start to pop within 20 seconds. Once the popping slows, remove from heat immediately, and drop puffs into a bowl. Repeat until you have the amount desired, making sure to maintain a hot pot bottom.

Finally, the other easy application is use amaranth flour in baking, once again pairing around 1/4 part amaranth flour with the other flour you are using in a recipe. 
PRICE: $3–$10 per pound, and a little goes a long way.
PROTEIN: 26 grams per cup
COOL FACT: Amaranth is considered a superfood. It is a complete protein, offering all of the essential amino acids your body requires to make use of the protein it offers.
 
Seitan (pictured)
If your body can handle gluten, then seitan is worth your time. Quite simply, seitan is the protein found in wheat. It is important to note that seitan is a processed food. However, unlike many other foods, the processing is quite limited. In fact, you can make seitan at home, and it takes about the same amount of time as a pie crust would. 
Whether you buy seitan ready-made or make it yourself, seitan is pretty much a blank canvas to start. A simple wayto use seitan and get a feel for it is to use it in a stir fry. Sauté onions, garlic and sesame seeds, then add in the seitan and let it cook and brown slightly before adding in whatever vegetables you’d like. 

If you want to make your seitan from scratch, you’ll need to buy “vital wheat gluten,” which is simply the protein in flour form. Doing it yourself allows you to season it the way you’d like from the very beginning. Follow the directions on the package to make it. It’s pretty straightforward: Create a dough, slice it into the cut size you’d like, and cook in boiling water. Once out of the water, you can use it any way you wish, including freezing some for later use. 
PRICE: $4 for 8 oz. packaged seitan; $6–$10 per pound of vital wheat gluten
PROTEIN: 75 grams of protein per 100 grams of seitan
COOL FACT: By itself, seitan is not a complete protein, however, if you cook it with soy sauce or liquid aminos, you’ll be adding the missing amino acids you need to complete the protein.
 
Try, Try Again
Our initial reaction to new foods can be negative because our system isn’t used to the taste. However, if you’re willing to experiment with them a few times you can grow to enjoy new flavors and textures. For instance, bitter foods are incredibly healthy for us, and while you might react unfavorably at first, with time you can actually even begin to crave the flavor. This is because our palate adapts based on what we are consuming, and our body craves the mineral diversity needed for optimum health.

The Good Ol’ Days Tasted Better
It’s not your imagination — food today isn’t as tasty or nutrient-rich as it used to be.  Want to understand why and what you can do to nourish your body better? I recommend two great books:
“The Dorito Effect” by Mark Schatzker
“Farmacology: Total Health from the Ground Up” by Daphne Miller
 
Taco Tuesdays!
Prefer to taste-test before you buy or cook? Head to Cultured Kombucha Co.’s Taproom for an upcoming Taco Tuesday: Chef Loghan will cook up plant-based tacos — paired with a kombucha mocktail! — so you can sample a new protein source while learning how to integrate it into your lifestyle. The first Taco Tuesday collaboration featured jackfruit — a tropical fruit that offers some protein — tacos (seen here). Stacked high with cilantro, sesame rice, and BBQ jackfruit, the tacos also sported some serious home-grown love: black garlic and cucumber herb cream from Bear Creek Organic Farm; umi plum pickled red cabbage and microgreens from Lakeview Hill Farm; and hand-madeorganic, non-GMO blue and yellow masa tortillas that were pressed and cooked to order. Better than lettuce and sour cream? Exactly.

Seitan will be the featured protein on Aug. 13, tempeh on Sept. 10, and quinoa on Oct. 8. Each event runs 4pm to 8pm and entry is free (there is a small charge for tacos and mocktails), but you must register for each event at www.drinkcultured.com. Find Cultured Kombucha Co. Taproom at 3842 Jupiter Cresent Dr. in Traverse City.
 
About Loghan Call
Chef Lohan is a regenerative food chef, activist, educator, and founder of Planted Cuisine, through which he offers pop-up dinners and events, as well as cooking classes, catering, and consulting services for groups and individuals. Learn more at www.plantedcuisine.com.

Natural sweeteners: Best options for diabetes and the keto diet – Medical News Today

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What is ‘dirty keto’ and does it work better than the keto diet? – Boston 25 News

You’ve probably heard of the ketogenic diet — the low-carb, high-fat, moderate-protein trend people everywhere seem to be raving about. But how much do you know about the dirty keto diet?

>> Read more trending news

The spin-off to keto follows the same big rules of its original, but with one big plus for fast food lovers: You can gorge on your junk food three times a day.

What is the keto diet?

The basics of the keto diet include a highly restrictive carb limit with a nearly unlimited intake of fats (as long as you’re within your calorie deficit). Fats account for about 80 percent of calories, protein around 20 percent and carbohydrates about 10 percent.

As the AJC previously reported, “for most people, that’s a big adjustment, since the average American gets close to half of his or her calories from carbs, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

These macronutrient ratios are intended to drive your body into ketosis, when your body turns to stored fat and protein instead of carbohydrates for energy.

Keto dieters typically gravitate toward organic, healthy low-carb foods like fish, eggs, vegetables, meat and natural fats (butter, olive oil, coconut oil). And it’s encouraged to limit saturated fats.

How is dirty keto different?

Unlike keto dieters, those on the so-called dirty keto diet might use some ratio principles of keto to indulge on traditionally unhealthy snacks. Think processed foods like pork rinds, sliced cheese, an egg-and-sausage sandwich (sans biscuit) or bacon cheeseburger (without the bun).

Dirty keto dieters are also less prone to focus on the keto-friendly sources of fiber, like vegetables. But overall, they zone in on the low-carb part of keto, and ignore the fat or protein aspects.

So you’re still getting less than about 20 grams of carbohydrates per day, but opting for foods most keto dieters would likely avoid.

“While there may be some foods you avoid because YOU react poorly to them, just because a food has added sugar or starch or wheat or whatever it is not off limits if it fits your macros,” according to administrators of the Facebook group, “The Dirty Keto Life.”

So, which works better for weight loss?

Some followers of the dirty keto diet claim they’ve had more success with weight loss, but “it’s a temporary fix at best,” nutritionist Scott Keatley told Women’s Health.

“The goal of a keto diet is to place your body into a physiological state of ketosis, where your body uses fat instead of sugar because there is limited available sugar,” Keatley said. “This state can be achieved through both good and bad methods.”

Dirty keto, he said, is “a really good way to lose lean body mass that is difficult to get back and aids in maintaining a high-functioning metabolism.” But it’s not a great idea in the long run.

According to Insider, the main issue with the dirty keto diet is its lack of micronutrients, vitamins and minerals vital to human health and body function.

“Even though micronutrients aren’t the star players in weight loss, when you’re trying to lose weight it’s important to focus on more than just calories in, calories out,” dietitian Trinh Le wrote in her blog. “It’s the quality of those calories that matter, and that is determined by the foods you choose to put in your body.”

Additionally, as Women’s Health points out, those on the dirty keto diet are also more likely to get swept up in the infamous “keto flu,” which involves flu-like symptoms caused by the body adapting to a low-carb diet.

“That’s likely because you’re choosing those super-processed foods, which don’t add much to your diet overall, over ones that can actually supplement your health, like healthy fats and vegetables,” the magazine reported.

Before you choose to go on the ketogenic (or its spin-off), be sure to check with your doctor, especially if you have a preexisting medical condition.

Learn more about the keto diet and its benefits or side effects.

What is ‘dirty keto’ and does it work better than the keto diet? – KIRO Seattle

You’ve probably heard of the ketogenic diet — the low-carb, high-fat, moderate-protein trend people everywhere seem to be raving about. But how much do you know about the dirty keto diet?

>> Read more trending news

The spin-off to keto follows the same big rules of its original, but with one big plus for fast food lovers: You can gorge on your junk food three times a day.

What is the keto diet?

The basics of the keto diet include a highly restrictive carb limit with a nearly unlimited intake of fats (as long as you’re within your calorie deficit). Fats account for about 80 percent of calories, protein around 20 percent and carbohydrates about 10 percent.

As the AJC previously reported, “for most people, that’s a big adjustment, since the average American gets close to half of his or her calories from carbs, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

These macronutrient ratios are intended to drive your body into ketosis, when your body turns to stored fat and protein instead of carbohydrates for energy.

Keto dieters typically gravitate toward organic, healthy low-carb foods like fish, eggs, vegetables, meat and natural fats (butter, olive oil, coconut oil). And it’s encouraged to limit saturated fats.

How is dirty keto different?

Unlike keto dieters, those on the so-called dirty keto diet might use some ratio principles of keto to indulge on traditionally unhealthy snacks. Think processed foods like pork rinds, sliced cheese, an egg-and-sausage sandwich (sans biscuit) or bacon cheeseburger (without the bun).

Dirty keto dieters are also less prone to focus on the keto-friendly sources of fiber, like vegetables. But overall, they zone in on the low-carb part of keto, and ignore the fat or protein aspects.

So you’re still getting less than about 20 grams of carbohydrates per day, but opting for foods most keto dieters would likely avoid.

“While there may be some foods you avoid because YOU react poorly to them, just because a food has added sugar or starch or wheat or whatever it is not off limits if it fits your macros,” according to administrators of the Facebook group, “The Dirty Keto Life.”

So, which works better for weight loss?

Some followers of the dirty keto diet claim they’ve had more success with weight loss, but “it’s a temporary fix at best,” nutritionist Scott Keatley told Women’s Health.

“The goal of a keto diet is to place your body into a physiological state of ketosis, where your body uses fat instead of sugar because there is limited available sugar,” Keatley said. “This state can be achieved through both good and bad methods.”

Dirty keto, he said, is “a really good way to lose lean body mass that is difficult to get back and aids in maintaining a high-functioning metabolism.” But it’s not a great idea in the long run.

According to Insider, the main issue with the dirty keto diet is its lack of micronutrients, vitamins and minerals vital to human health and body function.

“Even though micronutrients aren’t the star players in weight loss, when you’re trying to lose weight it’s important to focus on more than just calories in, calories out,” dietitian Trinh Le wrote in her blog. “It’s the quality of those calories that matter, and that is determined by the foods you choose to put in your body.”

Additionally, as Women’s Health points out, those on the dirty keto diet are also more likely to get swept up in the infamous “keto flu,” which involves flu-like symptoms caused by the body adapting to a low-carb diet.

“That’s likely because you’re choosing those super-processed foods, which don’t add much to your diet overall, over ones that can actually supplement your health, like healthy fats and vegetables,” the magazine reported.

Before you choose to go on the ketogenic (or its spin-off), be sure to check with your doctor, especially if you have a preexisting medical condition.

Learn more about the keto diet and its benefits or side effects.

What is ‘dirty keto’ and does it work better than the keto diet? – WSOC Charlotte

You’ve probably heard of the ketogenic diet — the low-carb, high-fat, moderate-protein trend people everywhere seem to be raving about. But how much do you know about the dirty keto diet?

>> Read more trending news

The spin-off to keto follows the same big rules of its original, but with one big plus for fast food lovers: You can gorge on your junk food three times a day.

What is the keto diet?

The basics of the keto diet include a highly restrictive carb limit with a nearly unlimited intake of fats (as long as you’re within your calorie deficit). Fats account for about 80 percent of calories, protein around 20 percent and carbohydrates about 10 percent.

As the AJC previously reported, “for most people, that’s a big adjustment, since the average American gets close to half of his or her calories from carbs, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

These macronutrient ratios are intended to drive your body into ketosis, when your body turns to stored fat and protein instead of carbohydrates for energy.

Keto dieters typically gravitate toward organic, healthy low-carb foods like fish, eggs, vegetables, meat and natural fats (butter, olive oil, coconut oil). And it’s encouraged to limit saturated fats.

How is dirty keto different?

Unlike keto dieters, those on the so-called dirty keto diet might use some ratio principles of keto to indulge on traditionally unhealthy snacks. Think processed foods like pork rinds, sliced cheese, an egg-and-sausage sandwich (sans biscuit) or bacon cheeseburger (without the bun).

Dirty keto dieters are also less prone to focus on the keto-friendly sources of fiber, like vegetables. But overall, they zone in on the low-carb part of keto, and ignore the fat or protein aspects.

So you’re still getting less than about 20 grams of carbohydrates per day, but opting for foods most keto dieters would likely avoid.

“While there may be some foods you avoid because YOU react poorly to them, just because a food has added sugar or starch or wheat or whatever it is not off limits if it fits your macros,” according to administrators of the Facebook group, “The Dirty Keto Life.”

So, which works better for weight loss?

Some followers of the dirty keto diet claim they’ve had more success with weight loss, but “it’s a temporary fix at best,” nutritionist Scott Keatley told Women’s Health.

“The goal of a keto diet is to place your body into a physiological state of ketosis, where your body uses fat instead of sugar because there is limited available sugar,” Keatley said. “This state can be achieved through both good and bad methods.”

Dirty keto, he said, is “a really good way to lose lean body mass that is difficult to get back and aids in maintaining a high-functioning metabolism.” But it’s not a great idea in the long run.

According to Insider, the main issue with the dirty keto diet is its lack of micronutrients, vitamins and minerals vital to human health and body function.

“Even though micronutrients aren’t the star players in weight loss, when you’re trying to lose weight it’s important to focus on more than just calories in, calories out,” dietitian Trinh Le wrote in her blog. “It’s the quality of those calories that matter, and that is determined by the foods you choose to put in your body.”

Additionally, as Women’s Health points out, those on the dirty keto diet are also more likely to get swept up in the infamous “keto flu,” which involves flu-like symptoms caused by the body adapting to a low-carb diet.

“That’s likely because you’re choosing those super-processed foods, which don’t add much to your diet overall, over ones that can actually supplement your health, like healthy fats and vegetables,” the magazine reported.

Before you choose to go on the ketogenic (or its spin-off), be sure to check with your doctor, especially if you have a preexisting medical condition.

Learn more about the keto diet and its benefits or side effects.

We Dare You Not to Eat These Healthy Snacks From Amazon All at Once – POPSUGAR Health and Fitness Australia

Snacking is an art form. When you find the ideal morsels that can travel easily and actually taste good while still being good for you, it can feel like striking gold. After a long search, we’ve found some healthy snacks that we can munch on guilt-free. Sometimes we want something sweet; other times it’s something salty. But no matter how our tastes may vary day to day, the ideal snack keeps us satiated and isn’t filled with crap. Ahead, we’ve rounded up the best healthy snacks, and they’re all available on Amazon! Just keep reading to shop!

What Is MCT Oil? | MCT Oil Benefits – Bicycling

If you’ve dipped your toe in the ketogenic diet, you’ve likely heard of MCT oil. But for those who haven’t, MCT oil is a source of medium-chain triglycerides—a fancy term for a type of fat—that’s been dominating the health food and supplement market lately. Examples of MCT oils include coconut and palm kernel oils, both of which are made up of about 50 to 60 percent MCTs.

As with many health trends and fads, fans of MCT oil boast its numerous health benefits including rapid weight loss, improved brainpower, and boosted athletic performance. But we tapped sports dietitian Kristen Chang, M.S., R.D.N., C.S.S.D., to weigh in on MCT oil and what athletes really need to know.

The Claim:

MCT oil has become popular thanks to the ketogenic diet. Long before the keto diet was adopted for weight loss, it was used (and still is) to help people suffering from epilepsy. MCT oil, Chang says, is thought to help keto users stay in a state of ketosis, even when consuming more carbohydrates than normally is allowed. This idea suggests that MCT oil could be linked with rapid weight loss.

Beyond its role in the keto diet, MCT oil tends to be absorbed more quickly thanks to its medium-length fatty acids, making its energy immediately available. “They’re believed to serve as an instant energy source and not be stored as fat,” Chang says. But she points out that the available research that suggests MCTs may not be stored as fat is limited and inconclusive.

It’s also thought that MCT oil is linked with a depressed appetite, increased brainpower, better gut health, and improved athletic performance.

The Evidence:

As a whole, Chang says, the evidence that supports the superpower strengths of MCT oil is limited and inconclusive at best.

With regard to MCT oil and the keto diet, Chang says: “The key thing for people to know is that people with epilepsy who undergo that diet [which is what it was originally designed for] are not on it for the long-term and are under the guidance and supervision of a medical professional. They’re watched very closely.”

While it’s true that MCTs are absorbed more quickly in the body and have about 10 percent fewer calories than long-chain triglycerides (LCTs)—which are found in heart-healthy omega-3s—that isn’t necessarily a good thing.

When your body uses MCTs as a quick source of energy, Chang says, it means it isn’t using its own fat stores. “MCT oil is rapidly digested and a great source of instant energy, but the downside to that is that you’re reducing your body’s ability to burn its own fat,” she says.

In other words, you’re introducing a substance that interrupts the way your body’s metabolism would function otherwise. And while you may get fewer calories from MCTs compared with LCTs, LCTs are the heart-healthy unsaturated fats found in avocados, olive oils, and nuts, that we know are good for our health as a whole.

“MCTs are not really talked about with regard to an overall health benefit. They’re associated with boosting metabolism, but that’s about it in terms of ‘health’ benefits,” Chang says. “Really, the only ‘healthy’ fats are unsaturated fats, and of those, mainly omega-3 fatty acids.”

When it comes to improved brain function, Chang says, there is a small area of research that suggests it may be helpful in people with Alzheimer’s disease. “That’s mainly where it’s studied right now but even with those studies, it still feels like more research is needed, and we can’t draw definite conclusions,” she says, pointing out that omega-3 fatty acids have also been tied with brain benefits.

The Verdict:

Like with many nutrition products that claim rapid weight loss or quick fixes, they’re often not backed by strong scientific evidence and thus, too good to be true. “There are healthier and better ways to achieve some of these same objectives,” Chang says.

For example, eating a diet high in fiber and lean protein can help you feel full longer, while also providing your body with the fuel it needs to ride and recover well. And exercising is the ultimate healthy way to burn more calories, rather than relying on a fatty oil supplement, Chang says, pointing out that adding MCT oil to your diet means you’re adding calories from fat.

[Build a killer midsection in the kitchen for powerful, effortless miles on the road with Eat for Abs.]

“If the rapid weight loss claims are true, it boils back down to sustainability,” Chang says. “Can you sustain this, and is it healthy to sustain over the long term? Based on what I see, most likely not.”

Coconut oil and palm kernel oil are other ways to add MCTs to your diet, but your best bet for improved brain and heart health, reduced inflammation from physical activity, and feelings of satiety, Chang says, is consuming unsaturated fats.

MCT Oil for Keto | MCT Oil Benefits – Bicycling

If you’ve dipped your toe in the ketogenic diet, you’ve likely heard of MCT oil. But for those who haven’t, MCT oil is a source of medium-chain triglycerides—a fancy term for a type of fat—that’s been dominating the health food and supplement market lately. Examples of MCT oils include coconut and palm kernel oils, both of which are made up of about 50 to 60 percent MCTs.

As with many health trends and fads, fans of MCT oil boast its numerous health benefits including rapid weight loss, improved brainpower, and boosted athletic performance. But we tapped sports dietitian Kristen Chang, M.S., R.D.N., C.S.S.D., to weigh in on MCT oil and what athletes really need to know.

The Claim:

MCT oil has become popular thanks to the ketogenic diet. Long before the keto diet was adopted for weight loss, it was used (and still is) to help people suffering from epilepsy. MCT oil, Chang says, is thought to help keto users stay in a state of ketosis, even when consuming more carbohydrates than normally is allowed. This idea suggests that MCT oil could be linked with rapid weight loss.

Beyond its role in the keto diet, MCT oil tends to be absorbed more quickly thanks to its medium-length fatty acids, making its energy immediately available. “They’re believed to serve as an instant energy source and not be stored as fat,” Chang says. But she points out that the available research that suggests MCTs may not be stored as fat is limited and inconclusive.

It’s also thought that MCT oil is linked with a depressed appetite, increased brainpower, better gut health, and improved athletic performance.

The Evidence:

As a whole, Chang says, the evidence that supports the superpower strengths of MCT oil is limited and inconclusive at best.

With regard to MCT oil and the keto diet, Chang says: “The key thing for people to know is that people with epilepsy who undergo that diet [which is what it was originally designed for] are not on it for the long-term and are under the guidance and supervision of a medical professional. They’re watched very closely.”

While it’s true that MCTs are absorbed more quickly in the body and have about 10 percent fewer calories than long-chain triglycerides (LCTs)—which are found in heart-healthy omega-3s—that isn’t necessarily a good thing.

When your body uses MCTs as a quick source of energy, Chang says, it means it isn’t using its own fat stores. “MCT oil is rapidly digested and a great source of instant energy, but the downside to that is that you’re reducing your body’s ability to burn its own fat,” she says.

In other words, you’re introducing a substance that interrupts the way your body’s metabolism would function otherwise. And while you may get fewer calories from MCTs compared with LCTs, LCTs are the heart-healthy unsaturated fats found in avocados, olive oils, and nuts, that we know are good for our health as a whole.

“MCTs are not really talked about with regard to an overall health benefit. They’re associated with boosting metabolism, but that’s about it in terms of ‘health’ benefits,” Chang says. “Really, the only ‘healthy’ fats are unsaturated fats, and of those, mainly omega-3 fatty acids.”

When it comes to improved brain function, Chang says, there is a small area of research that suggests it may be helpful in people with Alzheimer’s disease. “That’s mainly where it’s studied right now but even with those studies, it still feels like more research is needed, and we can’t draw definite conclusions,” she says, pointing out that omega-3 fatty acids have also been tied with brain benefits.

The Verdict:

Like with many nutrition products that claim rapid weight loss or quick fixes, they’re often not backed by strong scientific evidence and thus, too good to be true. “There are healthier and better ways to achieve some of these same objectives,” Chang says.

For example, eating a diet high in fiber and lean protein can help you feel full longer, while also providing your body with the fuel it needs to ride and recover well. And exercising is the ultimate healthy way to burn more calories, rather than relying on a fatty oil supplement, Chang says, pointing out that adding MCT oil to your diet means you’re adding calories from fat.

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“If the rapid weight loss claims are true, it boils back down to sustainability,” Chang says. “Can you sustain this, and is it healthy to sustain over the long term? Based on what I see, most likely not.”

Coconut oil and palm kernel oil are other ways to add MCTs to your diet, but your best bet for improved brain and heart health, reduced inflammation from physical activity, and feelings of satiety, Chang says, is consuming unsaturated fats.

Is There Such A Thing As A Clean-Eating Disorder? – Gildshire Magazines

You’re scrolling through Instagram and see lots of plates of food filled with colorful vegetables, salmon, roasted chicken, and so on. If you glance at the hashtags, you’ll likely see variations of #eatclean and #cleaneating. For those who follow health trends or diets, the clean-eating lifestyle is very familiar. There are lots of versions, but generally, it’s about avoiding anything processed. Instead, “clean eaters” choose whole foods, avoid anything in a package, and avoid anything with ingredients they can’t pronounce. On the surface, that sounds well and good, but it can actually lead to a clean-eating disorder that’s potentially dangerous. How is that possible? 

The history of “clean eating”

It seems like the term “clean eating” has been around forever, but it’s actually relatively new. We couldn’t track down who started it, but it first started popping up consistently less than 10 years ago. It was a response to peoples’ fears about packaged foods and artificial ingredients. Instead, the idea was that one could get healthier by eating “whole” foods or foods that have been as least processed as possible. Ingredients like bone broth, wild-caught fish, and organic produce were necessary. Unlike a diet, clean eating wasn’t about counting calories or cutting out entire food groups. It was about watching the quality of your food, knowing where it came from, and what was done to it. Nothing wrong with that, right?

If that’s where clean eating stopped, then yes, there is nothing wrong with that, and does probably result in a much healthier diet. However, as clean eating took off on social media, the rules and claims started to morph and change. Even the term started to take on insidious significance. The idea that certain foods are “clean” means that certain foods are “dirty,” and if you aren’t eating clean, you become dirty yourself. Influencers started getting strict and making their own definitions for “clean” to mean only vegan foods or only organic foods. It was a totally unregulated, chaotic bubble of clean vs. dirty.

The clean-eating disorder

When you start to believe that certain foods are clean or dirty, and have the power to make you clean or dirty, it can turn into an obsession. This clean-eating disorder even has a name: orthorexia nervosa. Research shows that people with a history of eating disorders, OCD tendencies, and body image issues are especially vulnerable. The need to “eat clean” takes over their lives and can lead to malnutrition, if they start to cut out food groups like dairy or gluten when they don’t need to. Instead of being driven by the need to be thin, which is what most people associate eating disorders with, it’s a need to be “healthy” and “clean.” 

Though orthorexia isn’t officially recognized by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, the term has been around since 1998. It’s just now becoming more well-known because of trends like clean eating. Symptoms include: 

  • Obsessively reading ingredient lists and nutritional labels 
  • Cutting out entire food groups (all sugar, all carbs, all dairy, all meat, etc)
  • Getting stressed about the quality of the food you’re eating and always wondering about everyone else’s food
  • When “clean” food isn’t available, refusing to eat anything and worrying about things like “toxins” 
  • Obsessively detoxing or “cleansing” when a “dirty” food is eaten 

It’s all about balance 

The term “clean eating” is loaded. The reality is that everything has chemicals with different effects on health, and there’s probably no easy way you can avoid eating something “dirty,” according to the nebulous guidelines. If you make your own clean-eating rules and take in the advice of trained nutritionists, and you’re able to live in a way where food doesn’t rule your life, committing to whole, less processed food is healthy. However, for many people, the clean-eating disorder is a real problem, and they take things too far. In the end, it’s all about balance, and acknowledging that eating a piece of candy or something in a box isn’t going to send your health spiraling down. You don’t become “dirty.” 

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The Keto diet often falls into the category of “clean eating.” What’s the science?