How “Buy Online, Pick Up in Store” Boosts Walmart’s Sales – Nasdaq

The distinction between online and in-store purchases doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing choice. That’s what Walmart (NYSE: WMT) has learned, and it’s offering customers a host of purchase options.

With “buy online, pick up in store,” otherwise known as BOPIS, the company is tuning in to the most current buyer behaviors. Customers like to order through a digital channel but procure it themselves, as we shall see.

How BOPIS works

The basic premise of BOPIS is exactly as it sounds: customers can browse online, where they purchase the items, and then pick them up from a store.

Why is this option so popular? And what do customers gain from BOPIS compared to home delivery or shopping at the store?

A man and woman loading a package into a car.

Image source: Getty Images.

The advantage over in-store shopping is clear: It saves time for busy customers.

But there are many other benefits to BOPIS. One is that customers don’t have to wait for brown boxes to show up at their doors. While Amazon.com is increasingly offering same-day service for many of its items, it’s not yet standard and doesn’t reach all households. And Amazon doesn’t have many free-standing stores, except for Whole Foods Markets.

Another benefit is that while many online retailers offer free shipping, many others don’t, especially for express options. Thus, BOPIS allows customers to save time shopping while also getting their packages quickly without paying for delivery.

Jamie Nordstrom, president of stores for Nordstrom, said of BOPIS: “It’s the single fastest-growing part of our business.” He also said it’s the most profitable.

How Walmart is getting it right

Numerous U.S. retailers are seeing the benefits of offering in-store pickup, including Macy’s, Gap, Target, Nordstrom, Best Buy, and many more. But Walmart has certain advantages.

For one, its sheer number of stores makes it easy for customers to use this service. There are over 5,000 Walmart stores across the U.S., so the likelihood of one being nearby is pretty high. The company says it now offers “fresh and perishable foods within 10 miles of 90% of the U.S. population.” Compare that with 870 stores for Macy’s and 345 Nordstrom stores (including all store formats).

Furthermore, in a customer-centric move, Walmart offers free pickup at any FedEx Office location. Customers can simply click on “choose FedEx location” at checkout, then pick from the available sites.

As part of its store pickup option, in many locations Walmart offers grocery pickup and loading: A customer can order online, and a Walmart personal shopper will put together the order and bring it straight to the customer’s car.

The last element of the Walmart BOPIS system is mobile check-in, where customers let the store know they’re on their way over, so it can have the order ready and waiting.

How it’s improving sales

An Adobe study on consumer spending for the 2019 Black Friday weekend noted the importance of BOPIS as a tool for retailers.

  • Year-to-date, BOPIS orders have been very strong, with a 39% increase over 2018.
  • 37% of shoppers are planning to use BOPIS for the holiday season.
  • 82% of BOPIS shoppers will make additional purchases while picking up their orders.

Earlier this year, Walmart CEO Doug McMillon said, “We’re … convinced [customers] want us and expect us to bring our stores and e-commerce businesses together in a digitally connected seamless way that makes shopping easier.”

As with the general retail trend, Walmart’s e-commerce business is growing at a fast pace, with U.S. e-commerce sales rising 41% last quarter. Clearly, Walmart’s strategy of using its physical assets to boost digital sales is paying off for the retailer.

During Walmart’s fourth-quarter earnings call back in February, McMillon said:

Our stores and clubs are becoming more digital, and we’re using technology to change how we work. More customers can now access our brand through multiple channels, and it’s important that we engage them in different ways. We’ve learned that those customers who shop with us both in stores and online spend about twice as much in total, and they spend more in our stores.

It’s also great for the company because it doesn’t have to shell out extra for the free delivery that appeals to customers. Walmart is competing heavily in this sphere with options including free next-day delivery on orders over $35 and free standard shipping with no minimum purchase. For example, Walmart CFO Brett Briggs noted that in last year’s fourth quarter, “Walmart U.S. gross margin rate declined 27 basis points due primarily to the increasing mix of e-commerce growth, pricing strategy, and higher transportation expenses.”

With BOPIS offering so many benefits for both the customer and the store, it’s sure to become an increasingly large part of this blue chip company’s sales.

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John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Jennifer Saibil has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Amazon and FedEx. The Motley Fool recommends Adobe Systems and Nordstrom. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

The 2019 Holiday Gift Guide for People With Diabetes – A Sweet Life

Looking for the perfect gift for your loved one with diabetes? This year we rounded up some items that are sure to be useful. Whether you’re searching for a high-end gift or something a little more affordable, we’ve got some ideas for you!

The Coziest Gift

Corala Blanket: The extra weight that you want on your body ;). 

Corala Blanket

Corala Blanket

We’ve wanted to try a weighted blanket for a long time, and this one is high quality and so attractive. Weighted blankets are said to address a host of health problems and promote better sleep. While many blankets on the market feature plastic beads, or have a design that allows all the beads to fall into one corner, the Corala blanket is made of 100% lead free glass beads and is double-stitched. It’s made of 100% soft, breathable cotton. A complete blanket set includes a queen size blanket in Pantone’s Living Coral color and it comes with summer and winter duvet covers, to ensure you always have the perfect level of insulation.

Our favorite books of the season

The Ultimate Guide to Keto Baking

The Ultimate Guide to Keto Baking

The Ultimate Guide to Keto BakingGrab an apron and your favorite mixing bowl and get ready to dive in as Carolyn Ketchum brings her passion for low-carb baking to life in The Ultimate Guide to Keto Baking. The creator of the popular blog All Day I Dream About Food and the author of several beloved cookbooks, Carolyn is famous for her delectable recipes for low-carb baked goods. With this comprehensive cookbook dedicated to ketogenic baking, you too can create mouthwatering baked goods that will satisfy every craving while maintaining your healthy lifestyle. 

The P:E DietThe P:E Diet

The P:E Diet

 by Dr. Ted Naiman and William Shewfelt explains the importance of food choice. Once you choose what to eat, your body will tell you how much to eat. This approach teaches you how to eat intuitively to achieve your goals. The exercise portion of the book demonstrates that all you need for the optimum adaptive response to exercise is to generate maximum tension in your muscles for the maximum time possible. This can be accomplished with bodyweight only!

The Practical Gift

Diathrive

Diathrive Glucometer

Diathrive Glucometer

If you have diabetes, test strips are crucial. So, while a subscription for diabetes supplies may not seem like the most exciting holiday gift, it scores big points with us because it’s so useful and practical. Diathrive provides low prices and delivers quality FDA-apprived products, conveniently and efficiently. No prescriptions are needed.

Diathrive allows you to order what you want, when you want. With a Diathrive subscription, you can “set it and forget it” and focus on your life, knowing you’ll get the right supplies when you need them.

Withings Fitness TrackersWithings Fitness Trackers

Withings Fitness Trackers

: Withings has an array of fitness trackers to choose from. We love the Steel HR Sport. It’s a hybrid smartwatch specifically designed for your workout, featuring heart rate monitoring, multi-sport tracking, connected GPS and a Fitness Level assessment via VO2 Max estimation. All of these advanced features are housed in a classic timepiece that goes the distance with water resistance up to 50m, a long-life battery of up to 25 days, and a durable stainless steel case. (Withings integrates with Strava!)

Are you searching for some stocking stuffers for your loved one with diabetes? Check out these products for the people in your life who keep carbs to a minimum.

Time for tea: Cozying up with a of hot tea is a perfect way to ease into a cold morning, or cap off the end of a day of sledding.  Celestial Seasonings has a tea for every taste, from vanilla rooibos to morning thunder (awesome name).

Keto cookies: Fill someone’s holiday cookie jar with any or all of Nui’s five flavors of low carb, keto cookies: Chocolate chip, Ginger Something, Snickerdoodle, Double Chocolate, and Peanut Butter.

Open sesame:  A 6.6 pound bucket of tahini from Pepperwood Organics! One of the world’s most nutritious foods, tahini, or sesame butter, is made of 100% ground sesame seeds. Tahini can be made into dips (including hummus, dressing, or even gluten-free bread. And it pairs well with cauliflower.

To the moon … cheese:  It’s not cheap, but it is crunchy and out-of-this-world tasty, so treat a loved one (or yourself) to some delicious moon cheese.  You can pick from cheddar, pepper jack, gouda, or mozzarella, and each bite satisfies snack cravings without boosting BGs.

Looks like pasta, tastes like pasta, must be… hearts of palm! Palmini is a low carb pasta substitute made 100% out of a natural plant known as Hearts of Palm. When this plant is cut and cooked in the proper way, its resemblance to regular pasta is remarkable.

Artisan salt:  Gourmet salts taste amazing, add some zing to your zoodles, and the packaging is so cute that these little containers look like holiday decorations all on their own.  This gift pack is perfect for a gift exchange or as a stocking stuffer for the foodie in your family.

Grass-fed beef sticks: Nick’s sticks are from 100% Grass-fed cows never given antibiotics or hormones. They’re seasoned with Redmond Organic Seasoned Salt and are free of nitrates, nitrites, gluten, and msg.

Spiralize it:  Looking to turn some basic vegetables into perfect “pasta” with a spiralizer.  Give the gift of delicious vegetable “noodles” with this low cost, low carb kitchen essential and make zoodles a new staple on everyone’s holiday table.

Say cheese You know what’s awesome?  Cheese.  It’s the seasonal gift basket everyone actually gets excited about and it’s gentle on your PWD’s blood sugars.  The Wisconsin Cheese Mart has everything you need, from nibbler baskets to cheese flights, for the cheese lover on your list. 

Mix it up:  Want to gift a mixer that’s perfect for parties and mild on blood sugars?  The team at Be Mixed has a collection of delicious drink mixers that any holiday party host would be happy to receive … and then hopefully share with guests.  Cheers to a low carb cocktail!

*Disclosure: ASweetLife/Diabetes Media Foundation received no compensation for including any products on this list. There may be a business relationship with one or more of the companies listed.

How to Make Almond Butter (Because It’s Like $15 a Jar) – Yahoo Lifestyle

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Ah, almond butter: It’s creamy, smooth, delicious and good for you to boot (more on that below). But there’s one thing that almond butter is not, and that’s cheap. Depending on where you live in the world, it can set you back up to $15 a jar. Another downside? The store-bought stuff is often filled with unnecessary ingredients like oils, too much salt and additives you can’t even pronounce. Fortunately, making your own is easy. All you need are almonds, a food processor or blender and a little bit of patience (OK, a lot of patience). Here’s how to make almond butter at home that tastes even better than store-bought.

What you’ll need

  • Approximately 3 cups of almonds
  • A food processor or high-speed blender
  • Salt
  • Optional extra flavorings like cinnamon, maple syrup, honey or vanilla extract

STEP 1: PREHEAT THE OVEN TO 350°F

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Toast the almonds on a large rimmed baking sheet for about&nbsp;ten&nbsp;minutes, stirring the nuts halfway. (Note:&nbsp;This step is optional, but it does add a certain&nbsp;je ne sais quoi&nbsp;to the finished product. It also helps them blend easier.)&nbsp;Remove the nuts from the oven and allow them to cool slightly” data-reactid=”51″>Toast the almonds on a large rimmed baking sheet for about ten minutes, stirring the nuts halfway. (Note: This step is optional, but it does add a certain je ne sais quoi to the finished product. It also helps them blend easier.) Remove the nuts from the oven and allow them to cool slightly

Step 2: Transfer the almonds to a high-speed blender or food processor fitted with an “S” blade

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The latter is better suited for making almond butter, but if you have&nbsp;a powerful high-speed blender, that’ll work too.&nbsp;Blend until&nbsp;the almonds start to change texture. (If your blender could use a little help, try adding a few tablespoons of oil to the mix.)” data-reactid=”53″>The latter is better suited for making almond butter, but if you have a powerful high-speed blender, that’ll work too. Blend until the almonds start to change texture. (If your blender could use a little help, try adding a few tablespoons of oil to the mix.)

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=" Cuisinart Elite Collection Food Processor &nbsp;$150 ” data-reactid=”71″>Cuisinart Elite Collection Food Processor  $150

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=" Vitamix Professional Series Blender &nbsp;$549 ” data-reactid=”91″>Vitamix Professional Series Blender  $549

Step 3: Keep blending

Making homemade almond butter can take anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes, depending on the size of your device. The almonds will first break down into powdery clumps and then collect around the edge of the bowl (pause the machine every few minutes and use a spatula to scrape down the side when this happens). Next, the mixture will transform into a sort of grainy almond paste, and finally, it will turn into that creamy consistency you know and love. Don’t be alarmed if your mixture gets hot—simply stop and let it cool down for a few minutes before continuing.

Step 4: Add flavor

Now that your almond butter is as smooth as, um, butter, it’s time to add any extra flavorings. A pinch of salt is definitely recommended to bring out the flavor of the almonds, but you could also add cinnamon, maple syrup, honey or vanilla extract. Start with ½ teaspoon and adjust to taste.

Step 5: Store the almond butter

Let the mixture cool to room temperature before transferring the almond butter to a sealed container (we like using a mason jar). Homemade almond butter will keep in the fridge for up to two weeks. 

What to make with almond butter

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Honestly, we could just eat this stuff straight out of the jar with a spoon (in fact, we have done exactly that on multiple occasions). But if you’re looking for more creative ways to&nbsp;use your&nbsp;homemade almond butter, give this&nbsp;charred broccoli with&nbsp;sriracha&nbsp;almond butter sauce recipe&nbsp;a go. On a diet? Treat yourself to these&nbsp;three-ingredient Paleo almond butter cups&nbsp;or&nbsp;Paleo almond butter granola bars. Alternatively, start the day with this Gwyneth Paltrow–approved&nbsp;blueberry-cauliflower smoothie&nbsp;made with almond butter for a protein boost. For&nbsp;other&nbsp;tasty ways to use almond butter, treat it the same way you would its cousin, peanut butter: Try it on a sandwich, as a dip for fruit and vegetables or stirred into oatmeal.” data-reactid=”99″>Honestly, we could just eat this stuff straight out of the jar with a spoon (in fact, we have done exactly that on multiple occasions). But if you’re looking for more creative ways to use your homemade almond butter, give this charred broccoli with sriracha almond butter sauce recipe a go. On a diet? Treat yourself to these three-ingredient Paleo almond butter cups or Paleo almond butter granola bars. Alternatively, start the day with this Gwyneth Paltrow–approved blueberry-cauliflower smoothie made with almond butter for a protein boost. For other tasty ways to use almond butter, treat it the same way you would its cousin, peanut butter: Try it on a sandwich, as a dip for fruit and vegetables or stirred into oatmeal.

Is it cheaper to make almond butter than to buy it?

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Terrible at math? Don’t sweat it—we’ve crunched the numbers for you. Let’s say you buy one pound (or 16 ounces) of almonds for $6.49 at the grocery store. Add them to your food processor or blender and you’ll have 16 ounces of nutritious and delicious almond butter. Meanwhile,&nbsp;a 16-ounce jar of Barney almond butter&nbsp;will set you back&nbsp;$11&nbsp;and&nbsp;keto&nbsp;dieters’ favorite&nbsp;Legendary&nbsp;almond&nbsp;butter&nbsp;costs a staggering&nbsp;$18.&nbsp;Justin’s classic almond butter&nbsp;is slightly cheaper at $7.39&nbsp;per jar, but whipping up your own will still save you a good chunk of cash (especially if you eat almond butter on the reg).” data-reactid=”101″>Terrible at math? Don’t sweat it—we’ve crunched the numbers for you. Let’s say you buy one pound (or 16 ounces) of almonds for $6.49 at the grocery store. Add them to your food processor or blender and you’ll have 16 ounces of nutritious and delicious almond butter. Meanwhile, a 16-ounce jar of Barney almond butter will set you back $11 and keto dieters’ favorite Legendary almond butter costs a staggering $18. Justin’s classic almond butter is slightly cheaper at $7.39 per jar, but whipping up your own will still save you a good chunk of cash (especially if you eat almond butter on the reg).

Of course, exactly how much cheaper the homemade stuff will be compared to store-bought will depend on the price of almonds where you are—we’re working with New York City prices here. Top tip: To get the most bang for your buck, buy your almonds in bulk, which tends to be cheaper (and keep a lookout for sales and markdowns). 

Are almonds healthy?

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Here’s some good news: Almonds are packed full of nutrients,&nbsp;including vitamin E, magnesium and potassium. They’re also a great source of protein (one ounce of almonds provides approximately one-eighth of your daily needs). And while almonds get a bad&nbsp;rap for their high fat content,&nbsp;it’s the healthy unsaturated kind. In fact,&nbsp;per a study&nbsp;published in the&nbsp;Journal of the American Dietetic Association, consuming almonds lowers cholesterol levels.&nbsp;Compared to&nbsp;peanut butter, almond butter has double the amount of fiber and&nbsp;roughly 50 percent less sugar. But&nbsp;as&nbsp;with everything, moderation is key (think a&nbsp;few tablespoons per day and not the entire jar).&nbsp;” data-reactid=”104″>Here’s some good news: Almonds are packed full of nutrients, including vitamin E, magnesium and potassium. They’re also a great source of protein (one ounce of almonds provides approximately one-eighth of your daily needs). And while almonds get a bad rap for their high fat content, it’s the healthy unsaturated kind. In fact, per a study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, consuming almonds lowers cholesterol levels. Compared to peanut butter, almond butter has double the amount of fiber and roughly 50 percent less sugar. But as with everything, moderation is key (think a few tablespoons per day and not the entire jar). 

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="RELATED:&nbsp;Here’s How to Make Almond Flour at Home, Plus Why You Should Bother in the First Place” data-reactid=”105″>RELATED: Here’s How to Make Almond Flour at Home, Plus Why You Should Bother in the First Place

It’s OK to indulge at the holidays. Just eat nutrient-rich foods the other days of year – Miami Herald

Eating lots of veggies will help you develop a nutrient-rich total diet.

Eating lots of veggies will help you develop a nutrient-rich total diet. Charlotte

I have seen many clients and made many recommendations over the course of my career. And it thrills me when I encounter former clients who tell me my recommendations are influencing them years later.

This happened last week when Carol told me she remembered me saying, “It doesn’t matter what you eat on Thanksgiving, it’s what you eat all the other days of the year.”

I didn’t craft this message but I often repeat it as I think it is such a simple explanation for a total diet approach.

The Dietary Guidelines define total diet as everything a person eats averaged over time. Total diet is the combination of all foods and beverages that provide energy and nutrients.

The variety of food a person eats is more important to health than focusing on a single food or nutrient or meal. Sweet potatoes with marshmallows and pecan pie do not doom someone to health consequences. And the same goes for what is eaten Christmas Eve or Christmas Day.

If your diet pattern, whether it is vegan, vegetarian, flexitarian or even keto, is built on naturally nutrient-rich foods, then you can absolutely enjoy holiday fare. One meal, one party day, or even a one-week cruise with unlimited buffet does not cause chronic disease.

It is a total diet of nutrient-rich foods over time that provides protection against chronic disease.

Another way of thinking about it: Have 80% of food intake be nutrient rich and allow 20% indulgent. For me that would be about 300 indulgent calories a day if I want them. Indulgence is not a daily requirement but fine if it occurs.

If one accepts and follows a total diet philosophy, then feelings of guilt or cheating would never rear their non-productive heads. Give yourself permission to continue enjoying the holidays with family, friends and, yes, food. It is what you eat before and after the holidays that impacts health.

Sheah Rarback MS, RDN is in private practice in Miami.

25 Inspiring Weight-Loss Transformation Before And Afters – Women’s Health

If you’re like any of the women in these incredible weight-loss transformation stories, you’ve struggled with hitting walls while trying to drop pounds and, at least once or twice, felt the temptation to throw in the towel on the whole d*mn thing. That just means you’re human.

It also means that you could use a serious dose of inspo from ladies who have stuck out their journey long enough to see real success. Because let’s face it: Losing weight is hard, and it’s even harder for women than men, thanks to metabolic and hormonal differences, research shows.

Most of the weight-loss warriors here tried multiple avenues, from going vegan to intermittent fasting to at-home Pilates workouts, before finding the methods and eating regimes that worked with their lifestyles. And part of their success was being realistic about what was achievable in the long run. Take it from one wise woman: “I promised in the beginning that I wouldn’t want to eat or do anything while losing weight that I wouldn’t want to eat or do once I hit [my] goal, even if that meant it took a little bit longer,” says @ashleys_officially_lost_it.

Finding a workout routine you love can also help keep you on track throughout the ups and downs. As one woman, @kaitlynesse, says, “Truly all of my weight loss came from working out to feel better and not to look a certain way. I just found this passion for it weightlifting I never had before,” she says, noting that lifting helped her fight through a bout of depression after a breakup.

One more nugget of advice? Don’t underestimate the small stuff, since any effort is better than no effort. “Even when you think those 30 minutes of walking won’t add up to anything, trust me—it will,” @branjay24 says. You have to keep telling yourself, “‘Yes, you are worth it!'” she adds.

Together, these powerful women lost more than 2,500 pounds—and gained so much strength along the way—which you’ll see in these dramatic before-and-afters. Take them in as needed to stay focused, inspired, and invested in your journey toward achieving your own health goals. If they can do it, so can you.

        @stellaisstriving lost 243 pounds—more than 42 percent of her starting body weight—by overhauling her eating habits with the keto diet and focusing on fat loss (not just losing pounds).

        @_jens_journey_ started out doing keto but didn’t feel that it worked for her, so she stuck with intermittent fasting, a sugar-free diet, and keeping her carbs down. She dropped more than 100 pounds—then gained back about 15 of those pounds to feel her healthiest, she previously told Women’s Health.

        It was WW that got @sweet_pea_leigh to a place of kicking her food addiction, which had been causing her to keep gaining weight as well as numerous body aches and pains. She’s lost over 150 pounds.

        The Couch to 5K app was hugely transformative for @lizzy_rockz—soon after hopping on the app, she started triathlon training and subsequently ran four marathons. Meal prepping with lots of protein and few carbs was huge for her, too, in her journey to lose about 150 pounds.

        @rachellsharp93 went down a little more than 100 pounds, starting with her own version of alternate-day fasting, consuming small amounts of food in between days, and then segueing into another type of intermittent fasting.

        Down about 220 pounds, @losing_for_health started out doing keto, then continued to count her macros with a free online calculator.

        Originally through gastric bypass surgery, @kathleeng1112 shed 179 pounds, but she kept it up by eating tons of protein and few carbs. She stays active with Pilates, yoga, and at-home workouts.

        @gessisfitnessjourney hit her goal of losing 124 pounds first by trying going vegan, then vegetarian, and low-carb, but she ultimately succeeded by tracking everything—calories, steps—on her Fitbit.

        It was a combination of keto and intermittent fasting that helped @gritandgrace__ lose more than 50 pounds and her status as prediabetic. Once she cut out sugar, her PCOS symptoms were more manageable, too.

          @hannah_day28’s big turnaround came from BeachBody toning workouts. She also began practicing clean eating and portion control. She still eats buffalo chicken, but in a zucchini boat rather than fried.

            She started out with VSG surgery, but @cam_bree_uhhh kept off 148 pounds by eating a vegan diet. She now belongs to two different gyms to stick with her love of weight lifting and doing circuits.

              @carlywontquit lost 108 pounds with a strict policy of no added sugar, even in her coffee. She’s also a cardio fanatic and can’t get enough of Zumba or Total Body Pump.

              Realizing the power of a nutritious home-cooked meal turned @_iwokeupinbeastmode;s nutrition around, helping her to lose a total of 130 pounds. She started out tracking every macro, but after hitting her goal, she stopped counting calories and focused on just eating clean instead.

              @laurenlosing did VSG surgery in 2013 as a tool to change her lifestyle. She kept going with eating a high-protein diet, counting macros, and weight lifting.

              A new-found love of lifting heavy was a major transforming factor for @kaitlynesse. She lost 80 pounds in about a year, focusing on squats and deadlifts, which she says made her feel strong and powerful. She also put on about 10 pounds of solid muscle in the process.

                Keto and kickboxing were the power duo for @thestairlady. She went down 100 pounds in a year without giving up her favorite food, pizza.

                @healthylivinislife’s weight-loss journey started with VSG surgery. She continued to drop 120 pounds through the keto diet, and then a general low-carb eating plan. She also supplemented with a hot-yoga routine to help with her anxiety and started running and amping up her core workouts, too.

                Struggling with symptoms of both PCOS and IBS, @get_moefit first cut carbs and started going beast mode in the gym, and then worked with a nutritionist to do an elimination diet. She cut out some cruciferous veggies that bothered her, as well as beef and pork (but kept other types of lean meat) to reduce GI issues and lose 80 pounds.

                Starting with gastric-sleeve surgery, @gi_sciortino shed 120 pounds and kept it off with intense strength-training and HIIT workouts.

                Counting calories with the My Fitness Pal app was a factor for @hayleysweightlossjourneyx to lose 70 pounds. “It was the simple science of tracking calories in vs. out, mixed with self-discipline and self belief,” she says.

                @journeytoslimsyddie dropped 140 pounds between VSG surgery, three to five weekly hard-core workouts in the gym, and eating mindfully (with a low-carb and high-protein diet).

                It all started with a fun, competitive “biggest loser” challenge at work for @branjay24. She lost 105 pounds by cutting out carbs and sweets and exercised six times a week. Another major factor for her? Taking care of her mental health throughout.

                @wokeuplikedez dropped 150 pounds after having gastric-bypass surgery, and then continued the momentum with a high-protein diet. She kept consuming fewer calories and working out more consistently than she had in the past, too.

                In the beginning, @ashleys_officially_lost_it tried losing weight simply by counting calories, but she needed more accountability and support, she says. She jumped on the WW (formerly Weight Watchers) bandwagon and later became an ambassador in the midst of her 120-pound weight loss, which she’s maintained for almost two years. Her transformation was mostly accomplished via healthier food swaps—she loves to make cleaner versions of favorite fast-food dishes, like a chipotle chicken avocado sandwich from Panera.

                Down 80 pounds from clean eating and at-home workouts, @beast_girl_22 toned up using BeachBody Body Beast. She also made a major change in her eating routine: switching from eating three healthy meals a day to eating smaller healthy meals every two to three hours, with lots of water.

                Fitness Contributor Mara is a freelance journalist whose print and digital work has appeared in Shape, Brit+Co, Marie Claire, Prevention, among other health, fitness, and wellness outlets.

                Spring 2020 Announcements: Cooking & Food – Publishers Weekly

                This spring sees more titles on the increasingly popular cuisines of Korea and Palestine, as well as those of two underexamined European regions, and two New York Times food writers come out with cookbooks of their own.

                Top 10

                Amboy: Recipes from the Filipino-American Dream

                Alvin Cailan and Alexandra Cuerdo. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, May 12 ($35, ISBN 978-1-328-93173-3)

                Cailin, owner of L.A.’s popular Eggslut restaurant and The Usual in New York City, shares favorite recipes from his Filipino-American upbringing.

                Ana Ros: Sun and Rain

                Ana Ros. Phaidon, Mar. 25 ($59.95, ISBN 978-0-7148-7930-7)

                Ros, the chef of the internationally acclaimed Hisa Franko in Slovenia, shares essays, stories, recipes, and photos of the countryside that influence her cooking.

                Bitter Honey: Recipes and Stories from Sardinia

                Letitia Clark. Hardie Grant, Apr. 28 ($35, ISBN 978-1-78488-277-8)

                Clark, the former pastry chef of the Michelin-starred restaurant Ellory in London, celebrates the Italian island of Sardinia and offers such dishes as malloreddus pasta with crab, saffron and tomato, and almond panna cotta with poached apricots.

                Chi Spacca: A New Approach to American Cooking

                Nancy Silverton, with Ryan Denicola and Carolynn Carreno. Knopf, Apr. 28 ($35, ISBN 978-0-525-65465-0)

                James Beard Award–winning chef Silverton shares recipes from Chi Spacca, her meat-focused L.A. restaurant, as she draws on her years living and cooking in Umbria, Italy.

                Dinner in French: My Recipes by Way of France: A Cookbook

                Melissa Clark. Clarkson Potter, Mar. 10 ($37.50, ISBN 978-0-553-44825-2)

                New York Times food writer Clark offers her take on 150 classic French recipes, with such dishes as cornmeal and harissa soufflé and lamb shank cassoulet.

                Falastin: A Cookbook

                Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley. Ten Speed, Apr. 28 ($35, ISBN 978-0-399-58173-1)

                Tamimi, longtime executive chef at Ottolenghi restaurants, gives readers a culinary and historical tour of his native Palestine.

                Meals, Music, and Muses: Recipes from My African American Kitchen

                Alexander Smalls, with Veronica Chambers. Flatiron, Feb. 11 ($35, ISBN 978-1-250-09809-2)

                Smalls, an opera singer and New York City restaurateur, offers recipes drawing on his South Carolina culinary roots. 50,000-copy announced first printing.

                Magnolia Table, Vol. 2: A Collection of Recipes for Gathering

                Joanna Gaines. Morrow, Apr. 7 ($35, ISBN 978-0-06-282018-1)

                Gaines follows up 2018’s Magnolia Table, which has sold 1.5 million print copies, per NPD BookScan, with 145 recipes for family meals.

                My Korea: Traditional Flavors, Modern Recipes

                Hooni Kim, with Aki Kamozawa. Norton, Apr. ($40, ISBN 978-0-393-43941-0)

                “In this exciting debut, Kim, chef at Michelin-starred New York City restaurant Danji, collects Korean recipes that are in turn spicy, funky, and comforting,” says PW’s starred review.

                See You on Sunday: A Cookbook for Family and Friends

                Sam Sifton. Random House, Feb. 18 ($35, ISBN 978-1-4000-6992-7)

                New York Times food editor and former restaurant critic Sifton brings back the art of Sunday supper with recipes meant for large gatherings.

                Cooking & Food Listings

                ABRAMS

                The United States of Cocktails: Recipes, Tales, and Traditions from Every State by Brian Bartels (May 19, $24.99, ISBN 978-1-4197-4287-3) explores state-by-state the history of cocktails in America, with illustrations, historical tidbits, and 100 recipes.

                Adams Media

                Keto Drinks: From Tasty Keto Coffee to Keto-Friendly Smoothies, Juices, and More, 100+ Recipes to Burn Fat, Increase Energy, and Boost Your Brainpower! by Faith Gorsky and Lara Clevenger (Apr. 21, $17.99 trade paper, ISBN 978-1-5072-1222-6) collects simple-to-concoct, low-carb coffees, juices, milkshakes, and smoothies.

                Akashic

                The Ralph Nader and Family Cookbook: Classic Recipes from Lebanon and Beyond by Ralph Nader (Apr. 7, $24.95, ISBN 978-1-61775-794-5). The political activist and his family share healthy, vegetable-focused recipes from his parents, who emigrated from Lebanon to Connecticut.

                America’s Test Kitchen

                100 Techniques: Master a Lifetime of Cooking Skills, from Basic to Bucket List, edited by America’s Test Kitchen (Apr. 7, $40, ISBN 978-1-945256-93-6). The editors of ATK disclose 100 cooking techniques and 200 recipes to help home cooks become masters of their kitchen.

                Artisan

                Mosquito Supper Club: Cajun Recipes from a Disappearing Bayou by Melissa M. Martin (Apr. 14, $35, ISBN 978-1-57965-847-2). New Orleans chef Martin presents oral histories and 100 Cajun recipes that celebrate her native region, which, she notes, is fast sinking into the Gulf of Mexico.

                Atria

                Procrastibaking: 100 Recipes for Getting Nothing Done in the Most Delicious Way Possible by Erin Gardner (Mar. 31, $24.99, ISBN 978-1-982117-74-0). The pastry chef and Erin Bakes blogger suggests 100 recipes for baking sweets from scratch, for those looking for an excuse to put off more important work.

                Avery

                Open Kitchen: Inspired Food for Casual Gatherings by Susan Spungen (Mar. 3, $35, ISBN 978-0-525-53667-3). “Spungen, founding food editor for Martha Stewart Living, serves up clever ideas for casual entertaining in this inspiring collection of guest-worthy recipes,” says PW’s review.

                Chronicle

                Eat Something: A Wise Sons Cookbook for Jews Who Like Food and Food Lovers Who Like Jews by Evan Bloom and Rachel Levin, illus. by George McCalman (Mar. 3, $29.95, ISBN 978-1-4521-7874-5). Bloom, co-owner of San Francisco’s deli Wise Sons, shares 60 Jewish recipes for meals for all occasions.

                Clarkson Potter

                The Phoenicia Diner Cookbook: Dishes and Dispatches from the Catskill Mountains by Mike Cioffi, Chris Bradley, and Sara B Franklin (Mar. 3, $32.50, ISBN 978-0-525-57513-9) collects 85 classic, comforting Americana dishes from the Phoenicia Diner in New York’s Catskill Mountains.

                Conran Octopus

                Leon Happy Fast Food by Rebecca Seal, John Vincent, and Jack Burke (Apr. 7, $24.99, ISBN 978-1-84091-807-6). The folks from the restaurant chain return with healthy takes on international fast food favorites, from hamburgers to donburis.

                Delacorte

                Outlander Kitchen: To the New World and Back Again: The Second Official Outlander Companion Cookbook by Theresa Carle-Sanders (June 2, $35, ISBN 978-1-984855-15-2) plates a second helping of 100 18th-century American- and Scottish-themed dishes.

                DK

                The Sicily Cookbook: Authentic Recipes from a Mediterranean Island by Cettina Vicenzino (Apr. 14, $30, ISBN 978-1-4654-9110-7) shares authentic Sicilian recipes, including peasant food, street food, and cucina dei monsù (fine-dining meals).

                Ebury

                The Book of St. John by Fergus Henderson and Trevor Gulliver (Mar. 1, $55, ISBN 978-1-5291-0321-2) highlights recipes from the eponymous British restaurant, including braised rabbit with mustard and bacon, and confit suckling pig shoulder with dandelion greens.

                The Experiment

                The Tinned Fish Cookbook: Easy. Sustainable. 100% Delicious by Bart Van Olphen (May 12, $18.95, ISBN 978-1-61519-674-6) realizes the potential of canned seafood with 45 recipes for tuna, mackerel, herring, and mussels.

                Fair Winds

                The Smoke Shop’s Backyard BBQ: Eat, Drink, and Party Like a Pitmaster by Andy Husbands and William Salazar (Feb. 18, $30, ISBN 978-1-59233-902-0). The owners of Boston’s Smoke Shop restaurant share recipes for pulled pork, chicken, pork belly, St. Louis ribs, and country ham and egg on Texas toast.

                Gibbs Smith

                Welcome to Buttermilk Kitchen by Suzanne Vizethann, photos by Angie Mosier (Apr. 21, $30, ISBN 978-1-4236-5346-2). The head chef of Atlanta’s Buttermilk Kitchen includes 100 modern farm-to-table Southern recipes that are equally healthy and comforting.

                Grub Street

                Preserving, Potting and Pickling: Food from the Storecupboards of Europe by Elisabeth Luard (July 19, $45,

                ISBN 978-1-911621-38-6). Following her European Peasant Cookery, Luard looks to the cupboards of Europe throughout history to retrieve recipes for English portable soup, the honey-and-almond turrón of Moorish Spain, and the marzipan of southern France.

                Hachette Go!

                Pamela Salzman’s Quicker Than Quick: 140 Crave-Worthy Recipes for Healthy Comfort Foods in 30 Minutes or Less by Pamela Salzman (Apr. 21, $28, ISBN 978-0-7382-8567-2). The L.A. cooking instructor and Kitchen Matters author collects her favorite healthy, quickly prepared, family-friendly recipes

                Harper Design

                Chicano Eats: Recipes from the Border by Esteban Castillo (Apr. 28, $29.99, ISBN 978-0-06-291737-9). The creator of the Chicano Eats blog presents this survey of Chicano cuisine—Mexican food inspired by other ethnic and regional American dishes: poutine de carnitas, pistachio horchata, and masa chicken and dumplings.

                Harper Wave

                Start Simple: Eleven Everyday Ingredients for Countless Weeknight Meals by Lukas Volger (Feb. 18, $30, ISBN 978-0-06-288359-9). From the creator of the James Beard Award–winning Jarry magazine comes this volume of everyday vegetarian cooking, based on 11 ingredients: sweet potatoes, tortillas, eggs, cabbage, hearty greens, beans, winter squash, mushrooms, tofu, summer squash, and cauliflower.

                Harvard Common

                The No Waste Vegetable Cookbook: 100+ Recipes and Techniques for Whole Plant Cooking by Linda Ly (Apr. 7, $25, ISBN 978-1-55832-997-3). Building on her CSA Cookbook, Ly shares 105 seasonal recipes to make good use of greens, beans, roots, and herbs.

                Health Communications

                My Pinewood Kitchen, a Southern Culinary Cure: 100+ Crazy Delicious, Gluten-Free Recipes to Reduce Inflammation and Make Your Gut Happy by Mee McCormick (Apr. 14, $26.95 trade paper, ISBN 978-0-7573-2352-2) incorporates Southern-inspired recipes for more healthy meals.

                Hearst Home

                Healthy Keto: Prevention Healing Kitchen: 75+ Plant-Based, Low-Carb, High-Fat Recipes by the editors of Prevention (Mar. 10, $19.99, ISBN 978-1-950785-05-6) suggests a plant-based approach to the keto diet with 75 high-fat, low-carb recipes.

                Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

                Serial Griller: Grillmaster Secrets for Flame-Cooked Perfection by Matt Moore (Apr. 21, $26.99, ISBN 978-0-358-18726-4). The master griller imparts barbecue wisdom, incorporating various methods and techniques he learned while grilling throughout America. 60,000-copy announced first printing.

                HMH/Martin

                Faith, Family & the Feast: Recipes to Feed Your Crew from the Grill, Garden, and Iron Skillet by Kent and Shannon Rollins (Mar. 17, $30, ISBN 978-0-358-12449-8). Husband-and-wife authors follow up A Taste of Cowboy with their take on Southern and Western favorites, such as honey-chipotle chicken and cracklin’ cornbread in the skillet. 60,000-copy announced first printing.

                Kyle

                The Pastry School: Master Sweet and Savoury Pies, Tarts and Pastries at Home by Julie Jones (Apr. 7, $34.99, ISBN 978-0-85783-780-6) is a master class on baking dishes both sweet and savory with 70 recipes, including tartiflette miniature pie and a chamomile panna cotta tart.

                Morrow

                The Batch Lady by Suzanne Mulholland (Apr. 14, $28.99, ISBN 978-0-06-300030-8). Mulholland instructs on how to save money and eliminate waste by planning and shopping ahead and by cooking weekly meals in batches.

                Murdoch

                Made for You: Spring: Recipes for Gifts and Celebrations by Sophie Hansen (Apr. 14, $12.99, ISBN 978-1-911632-79-5) shares ideas for preparing, packing, and presenting seasonal recipes for those celebrating milestone occasions, recovering from illnesses, or simply as a gift.

                Page Street

                Beyond Borscht: Old World Recipes from Ukraine and Eastern Europe by Tatyana Nesteruk (Mar. 31, $21.99 trade paper, ISBN 978-1-62414-960-3). Eastern European food blogger Nesteruk opens a window onto the food and customs of her native Ukraine, and includes dishes from Russia and other Eastern European countries.

                Pavilion

                30 Easy Ways to Join the Food Revolution: A Sustainable Cookbook by Ollie Hunter (Mar. 17, $19.95, ISBN 978-1-911641-34-6) suggests a 30-day plan of recipes containing local and homemade ingredients in order to leave the lowest possible carbon footprint.

                Plum

                Easy Keto: 70+ Simple and Delicious Ideas by Pete Evans (Mar. 1, $18.95 trade paper, ISBN 978-1-76078-181-1) instructs home cooks new to keto how to prepare meals low in carbs and high in healthy fats, and includes tips on shopping and stocking a pantry.

                Quadrille

                Charred: The Complete Guide to Vegetarian Grilling and Barbecue by Genevieve Taylor (May 5, $22.99, ISBN 978-1-78713-427-0). These 70 recipes highlight vegetables on the outdoor grill, such as whole roast cauliflower in spiced garlic butter, griddled radicchio with burrata and figs, and corn on the cob with Cambodian coconut, lime, and chili.

                Quercus

                Khazana: A Treasure Trove of Indo-Persian Recipes Inspired by the Mughals by Saliha Mahmood Ahmed (Mar. 2, $30, ISBN 978-1-4736-7856-9). Winner of MasterChef 2017, Ahmed brings to the table her fusion of Indo-Persian food, with such recipes as smoked chicken-and-basil kebabs, and mogul baked cod korma.

                Rizzoli

                The Ladies’ Village Improvement Society Cookbook: Eating and Entertaining in East Hampton by Florence Fabricant (Apr. 7, $45, ISBN 978-0-8478-6519-2) celebrates the food of the Hamptons, highlighting local farmers and vintners, as well as members of Hamptons society who have roots in the food world, such as Martha Stewart, Ina Garten, Alex Guarnaschelli, and Eli Zabar.

                Roost

                Modern Country Cooking: Kitchen Skills and Seasonal Recipes from Salt Water Farm by Annemarie Ahearn (Apr. 21, $35, ISBN 978-1-61180-654-0). The proprietor of the cooking school at Maine’s Salt Water Farm offers this guide to kitchen fundamentals in 75 recipes.

                Running Press

                The Bob Ross Cookbook: Happy Little Recipes for Family and Friends by Robb Pearlman (May 26, $20, ISBN 978-0-7624-6913-0) features comfort food inspired by the landscape paintings of Bob Ross, and featuring quotes and full-color food illustrations by the artist.

                Ryland Peters & Small

                Share: Delicious Platters and Boards for Social Dining by Theo A. Michaels (Mar. 10, $19.95, ISBN 978-1-78879-211-0). The MasterChef UK finalist and Orexi! author shares 75 dishes presented on platters or boards to be shared by a group, be it a Sunday brunch, summer picnic, or Thanksgiving dinner.

                Simon & Schuster

                Everyone Can Bake: Simple Recipes to Master and Mix by Dominique Ansel (Apr. 14, $35, ISBN 978-1-5011-9471-9). French-born, New York City pastry chef Ansel takes the fear out of baking by offering building blocks for making jams and buttercream and for creating tarts and cakes.

                Smith Street

                High Tea: Cannabis Cakes, Tarts & Bakes by Diana Isaiou (Apr. 21, $19.95, ISBN 978-1-925811-43-8) takes a British-style, high tea approach to preparing and serving cannabis-laced baked goods—as in cannabis croquembouche and sativa butter tarts.

                Sourcebooks

                Rustic Joyful Food: Generations by Danielle Kartes (Feb. 17, $29.99, ISBN 978-1-4926-9789-3). Kartes, who appears regularly on the Rachael Ray Show, brings to the table comfort food as passed down through generations of her family.

                Sterling

                Eat Well, Be Well: 100 Plant-Based, Gluten-Free & Refined-Sugar-Free Recipes by Jana Cristofano (Apr. 7, $24.95, ISBN 978-1-4549-3377-9). Nutritioncity blogger Cristofano helps home cooks create vegetarian meals that are free of gluten and refined sugar.

                St. Martin’s Essentials

                Pinch of Nom: 100 Slimming Home-Style Recipes by Kate Allinson and Kay Featherstone (May 12, $29.99, ISBN 978-1-250-26955-3). From the U.K. food blog Pinch of Nom comes this collection of recipes to help home cooks lose weight, especially those following Weight Watchers or other goal-oriented eating programs.

                Storey

                Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner: 50 Winning Ways to Cook It Up! by Stacie Billis (Apr. 28, $16.95 trade paper, ISBN 978-1-63586-156-3) highlights the versatility of poultry with such recipes as tarragon chicken with fennel and lemon, and za’atar chicken with pine nuts and dates.

                Ten Speed

                Beyond the North Wind: Russia in Recipes and Lore by Darra Goldstein (Feb. 4, $37.50, ISBN 978-0-399-58039-0). In 100 recipes, both traditional and contemporary, Goldstein surveys the food of Russia, known for its whole grains, preserved and fermented foods, and hearty dishes.

                Friuli Food and Wine: Frasca Cooking from Northern Italy’s Mountains, Vineyards, and Seaside by Bobby Stuckey, Lachlan Mackinnon-Patterson, and Meredith Erickson (Apr. 21, $45, ISBN 978-0-399-58061-1). Master sommelier Stucky and James Beard Award–winning chef Mackinnon-Patterson open a window onto the food of Italy’s northeast Friuli Venezia Giulia, a region bordered by Austria, Slovenia, and the Adriatic Sea.

                Tiller

                Tequila & Tacos: A Guide to Spirited Pairings by Katherine Cobbs (Apr. 21, $19.99, ISBN 978-1-982137-59-5) pairs two Mexican favorites, featuring classic tacos, as well as such new takes as one with fried brussels sprouts that can be accompanied by, perhaps, a mezcal Manhattan.

                Universe

                The Goldbergs Cookbook by Beverly Goldberg and Jenn Fujikawa (Apr. 7, $19.95, ISBN 978-0-7893-3675-0). Fans of the TV sitcom The Goldbergs will find 1980s-inspired retro dishes such as Beverly’s Shrimp Parm and Barry’s Special Power Chili.

                Workman

                A Radically Practical Guide to Conscious Eating: Making Food Choices That Are Good for You, Others, and the Planet by Sophie Egan (Mar. 17, $16.95 trade paper, ISBN 978-1-5235-0738-2) encourages conscientious home cooks to make informed environmental choices when purchasing and disposing of food and offers tips on eating and cooking sustainably.

                Return to the main feature.

                A version of this article appeared in the 12/09/2019 issue of Publishers Weekly under the headline: Cooking & Food

                Sweet, Soft Keto Pecan Crescent Cookies Are A Holiday Must! – Yahoo Lifestyle

                Oxnard: “Pelosi noted that impeachment proceedings will reinforce that, unlike a king, the president’s word is not law” Then why is the party supporting candidates like Kamala Harris who stated that she was going to give Congress x amount of days to act on certain campaign promises of hers and if they didn’t, she would use Executive Orders to do it anyway? That SURE sounds like ‘ruling by decree’ like a king or a dictator, but I guess since it’s a DEMOCRAT dictator that’s ok eh?

                How a keto diet helped this food writer lose 25 pounds in 2 months — even over Thanksgiving – Yahoo Lifestyle

                <p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Writing about food for a living, as I’ve been doing for the better part of the past 10 years, makes each day at the office a gauntlet of temptation. On any given day, doughnuts might arrive from Krispy Kreme for breakfast, some fried chicken from Popeye’s could show up around lunchtime and any assortment of goodies could make their way to our desks throughout the day, especially around the holidays.” data-reactid=”11″>Writing about food for a living, as I’ve been doing for the better part of the past 10 years, makes each day at the office a gauntlet of temptation. On any given day, doughnuts might arrive from Krispy Kreme for breakfast, some fried chicken from Popeye’s could show up around lunchtime and any assortment of goodies could make their way to our desks throughout the day, especially around the holidays.

                <p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="That’s why I knew that starting, and maintaining, the keto diet would be a serious challenge. Cutting out carbs and sweets meant saying “no” to a lot of those tasty treats that circulate through the office as well as adopting a whole new way of eating. But two months, 25 pounds and one Thanksgiving later, I think it’s safe to say that if I can do it, anyone can.

                If you’re unfamiliar with the keto diet, here’s a quick primer: By strictly limiting carbohydrate intake (usually to no more than 20 or 30 carbs per day) and increasing fat intake, you put your body into what’s called ketosis. During ketosis, your body no longer burns glucose (which is what carbs are broken down into) for energy, but instead burns fat. Obviously the details of ketosis are a lot more complicated than this, but that’s the gist of it.

                ” data-reactid=”12″>That’s why I knew that starting, and maintaining, the keto diet would be a serious challenge. Cutting out carbs and sweets meant saying “no” to a lot of those tasty treats that circulate through the office as well as adopting a whole new way of eating. But two months, 25 pounds and one Thanksgiving later, I think it’s safe to say that if I can do it, anyone can.

                If you’re unfamiliar with the keto diet, here’s a quick primer: By strictly limiting carbohydrate intake (usually to no more than 20 or 30 carbs per day) and increasing fat intake, you put your body into what’s called ketosis. During ketosis, your body no longer burns glucose (which is what carbs are broken down into) for energy, but instead burns fat. Obviously the details of ketosis are a lot more complicated than this, but that’s the gist of it.

                <p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Starting the keto diet comes with a big learning curve. So much of the standard American diet revolves around carbs that many of us don’t even realize how carb-laden certain things are, and holiday foods, in particular, are especially carby (hello, mashed potatoes, stuffing and mac and cheese all sharing a plate). Sure, bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, beans and sweets are loaded with carbs, but it was a bit of a shock to learn that a can of Campbell’s tomato soup contains 45 carbs, for example, or that a slice of apple pie contains 51 carbs and that Trader Joe’s cauliflower pizza crust — which sounds like it should be low-carb — contains 17 carbs per slice (of which there are six). Cocktails and beer are also out of the equation, sadly.” data-reactid=”13″>Starting the keto diet comes with a big learning curve. So much of the standard American diet revolves around carbs that many of us don’t even realize how carb-laden certain things are, and holiday foods, in particular, are especially carby (hello, mashed potatoes, stuffing and mac and cheese all sharing a plate). Sure, bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, beans and sweets are loaded with carbs, but it was a bit of a shock to learn that a can of Campbell’s tomato soup contains 45 carbs, for example, or that a slice of apple pie contains 51 carbs and that Trader Joe’s cauliflower pizza crust — which sounds like it should be low-carb — contains 17 carbs per slice (of which there are six). Cocktails and beer are also out of the equation, sadly.

                <p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="On the other hand, it’s been refreshing to learn how many foods contain few or no carbs. Meat is essentially carb-free, as are eggs, many cheeses and lots of vegetables. Some vegetables are higher in carbs than others (including carrots, corn, peas, butternut squash and sweet potatoes), but the vast majority are keto-friendly. There are also plenty of keto-friendly snacks, including Whisps and Moon Cheese (which are made out of cheese that’s baked until it gets hard and crunchy), nuts (in moderation), seaweed snacks, meat sticks, plain yogurt, Mini Babybels and pork rinds. New products like Crepini’s Egg Thins, which are essentially carb-free crepes, and Unbuns, buns that are made with almond flour and contain only 5 net carbs, are also changing the low-carb landscape.

                After deciding to take the plunge, my wife and I got into ketosis within a week (some experience a general malaise called “keto flu” as the body adapts, but that didn’t happen to us) and quickly got into a rhythm. Planning meals in advance has really helped: During the weekend, we’ll prep for the week ahead by making egg muffins (eggs and a variety of add-ins baked in muffin tins) and chia pudding (chia seeds and unsweetened almond milk, sweetened with stevia) mixed with yogurt for breakfast, and by shopping for lots of meats, seafood, veggies and salad greens for lunch and dinner. I also whip up a big batch of mustard vinaigrette with avocado or olive oil, which goes great on everything from salad to pork tenderloin, and we’ve begun experimenting with spice blends, like berbere, tandoor masala and herbes de Provence to keep things interesting.

                ” data-reactid=”14″>On the other hand, it’s been refreshing to learn how many foods contain few or no carbs. Meat is essentially carb-free, as are eggs, many cheeses and lots of vegetables. Some vegetables are higher in carbs than others (including carrots, corn, peas, butternut squash and sweet potatoes), but the vast majority are keto-friendly. There are also plenty of keto-friendly snacks, including Whisps and Moon Cheese (which are made out of cheese that’s baked until it gets hard and crunchy), nuts (in moderation), seaweed snacks, meat sticks, plain yogurt, Mini Babybels and pork rinds. New products like Crepini’s Egg Thins, which are essentially carb-free crepes, and Unbuns, buns that are made with almond flour and contain only 5 net carbs, are also changing the low-carb landscape.

                After deciding to take the plunge, my wife and I got into ketosis within a week (some experience a general malaise called “keto flu” as the body adapts, but that didn’t happen to us) and quickly got into a rhythm. Planning meals in advance has really helped: During the weekend, we’ll prep for the week ahead by making egg muffins (eggs and a variety of add-ins baked in muffin tins) and chia pudding (chia seeds and unsweetened almond milk, sweetened with stevia) mixed with yogurt for breakfast, and by shopping for lots of meats, seafood, veggies and salad greens for lunch and dinner. I also whip up a big batch of mustard vinaigrette with avocado or olive oil, which goes great on everything from salad to pork tenderloin, and we’ve begun experimenting with spice blends, like berbere, tandoor masala and herbes de Provence to keep things interesting.

                <p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Going out to eat can be a challenge, but it’s surprisingly easy to find keto-friendly foods at restaurants if you know what to avoid. Non-breaded Buffalo wings are (mercifully) very low-carb, and just about every restaurant serves a burger (which can go bunless), steak and chicken or fish of some sort. It was also nice to learn that distilled spirits are essentially carb-free, which means that mixed drinks like vodka soda get the thumbs-up, as do hard seltzers like Truly and White Claw (which contain on average just 2 carbs per can). Wine is also surprisingly low in carbs; most only contain 2 or 3 per glass.

                The Holidays are bound to be difficult for dieters, and Thanksgiving was no exception. The impending carb-heavy traditional meal hung over our heads as we started the diet, but with some advance planning, the holiday proved to not be nearly as challenging as it could have been. We got in touch with the host a couple weeks in advance and let them know the situation (just as anyone with any dietary restrictions should do), and so in lieu of mashed potatoes and stuffing, we loaded our plates with turkey, roasted Brussels sprouts with bacon, prosciutto-wrapped asparagus, roasted curry-spiced cauliflower and a tricolor salad with toasted pecans and goat cheese. Instead of gravy, we topped the turkey with some reserved pan juices from the roasting. Doesn’t sound so bad, does it?

                Since starting the diet, we’ve definitely noticed some changes. Not only have we both lost a significant amount of weight and inches, we’re both sleeping deeper and are generally more alert. And because our bodies are fueled by fat instead of carbs, we’re no longer experiencing the dreaded “carb crash” at work.

                ” data-reactid=”15″>Going out to eat can be a challenge, but it’s surprisingly easy to find keto-friendly foods at restaurants if you know what to avoid. Non-breaded Buffalo wings are (mercifully) very low-carb, and just about every restaurant serves a burger (which can go bunless), steak and chicken or fish of some sort. It was also nice to learn that distilled spirits are essentially carb-free, which means that mixed drinks like vodka soda get the thumbs-up, as do hard seltzers like Truly and White Claw (which contain on average just 2 carbs per can). Wine is also surprisingly low in carbs; most only contain 2 or 3 per glass.

                The Holidays are bound to be difficult for dieters, and Thanksgiving was no exception. The impending carb-heavy traditional meal hung over our heads as we started the diet, but with some advance planning, the holiday proved to not be nearly as challenging as it could have been. We got in touch with the host a couple weeks in advance and let them know the situation (just as anyone with any dietary restrictions should do), and so in lieu of mashed potatoes and stuffing, we loaded our plates with turkey, roasted Brussels sprouts with bacon, prosciutto-wrapped asparagus, roasted curry-spiced cauliflower and a tricolor salad with toasted pecans and goat cheese. Instead of gravy, we topped the turkey with some reserved pan juices from the roasting. Doesn’t sound so bad, does it?

                Since starting the diet, we’ve definitely noticed some changes. Not only have we both lost a significant amount of weight and inches, we’re both sleeping deeper and are generally more alert. And because our bodies are fueled by fat instead of carbs, we’re no longer experiencing the dreaded “carb crash” at work.

                <p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Obviously, the keto diet isn’t for everybody, and I’m not claiming to be an expert on all of its ins and outs. It’s more of a lifestyle than a diet, which means that if we go back to eating as many carbs as we used to, we’ll begin metabolizing glucose for energy instead of fat again and we’ll most likely gain all the weight back. And we know that once we get to our ideal weight, maintaining it will be another challenge unto itself. But we’re taking it one day at a time, learning as we go, and knowing that if we can make it through the Holidays, we can make it through anything.” data-reactid=”18″>Obviously, the keto diet isn’t for everybody, and I’m not claiming to be an expert on all of its ins and outs. It’s more of a lifestyle than a diet, which means that if we go back to eating as many carbs as we used to, we’ll begin metabolizing glucose for energy instead of fat again and we’ll most likely gain all the weight back. And we know that once we get to our ideal weight, maintaining it will be another challenge unto itself. But we’re taking it one day at a time, learning as we go, and knowing that if we can make it through the Holidays, we can make it through anything.

                <p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Dan Myers is Deputy Editor at The Daily Meal. You can follow him on Instagram @sirmyers.” data-reactid=”19″>Dan Myers is Deputy Editor at The Daily Meal. You can follow him on Instagram @sirmyers.

                How a Keto Diet Helped Me Lose 25 Pounds in 2 Months — Even Over Thanksgiving – The Daily Meal

                Writing about food for a living, as I’ve been doing for the better part of the past 10 years, makes each day at the office a gauntlet of temptation. On any given day, doughnuts might arrive from Krispy Kreme for breakfast, some fried chicken from Popeye’s could show up around lunchtime and any assortment of goodies could make their way to our desks throughout the day, especially around the holidays.

                That’s why I knew that starting, and maintaining, the keto diet would be a serious challenge. Cutting out carbs and sweets meant saying “no” to a lot of those tasty treats that circulate through the office as well as adopting a whole new way of eating. But two months, 25 pounds and one Thanksgiving later, I think it’s safe to say that if I can do it, anyone can.

                If you’re unfamiliar with the keto diet, here’s a quick primer: By strictly limiting carbohydrate intake (usually to no more than 20 or 30 carbs per day) and increasing fat intake, you put your body into what’s called ketosis. During ketosis, your body no longer burns glucose (which is what carbs are broken down into) for energy, but instead burns fat. Obviously the details of ketosis are a lot more complicated than this, but that’s the gist of it.

                Starting the keto diet comes with a big learning curve. So much of the standard American diet revolves around carbs that many of us don’t even realize how carb-laden certain things are, and holiday foods, in particular, are especially carby (hello, mashed potatoes, stuffing and mac and cheese all sharing a plate). Sure, bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, beans and sweets are loaded with carbs, but it was a bit of a shock to learn that a can of Campbell’s tomato soup contains 45 carbs, for example, or that a slice of apple pie contains 51 carbs and that Trader Joe’s cauliflower pizza crust — which sounds like it should be low-carb — contains 17 carbs per slice (of which there are six). Cocktails and beer are also out of the equation, sadly.

                On the other hand, it’s been refreshing to learn how many foods contain few or no carbs. Meat is essentially carb-free, as are eggs, many cheeses and lots of vegetables. Some vegetables are higher in carbs than others (including carrots, corn, peas, butternut squash and sweet potatoes), but the vast majority are keto-friendly. There are also plenty of keto-friendly snacks, including Whisps and Moon Cheese (which are made out of cheese that’s baked until it gets hard and crunchy), nuts (in moderation), seaweed snacks, meat sticks, plain yogurt, Mini Babybels and pork rinds. New products like Crepini’s Egg Thins, which are essentially carb-free crepes, and Unbuns, buns that are made with almond flour and contain only 5 net carbs, are also changing the low-carb landscape.

                After deciding to take the plunge, my wife and I got into ketosis within a week (some experience a general malaise called “keto flu” as the body adapts, but that didn’t happen to us) and quickly got into a rhythm. Planning meals in advance has really helped: During the weekend, we’ll prep for the week ahead by making egg muffins (eggs and a variety of add-ins baked in muffin tins) and chia pudding (chia seeds and unsweetened almond milk, sweetened with stevia) mixed with yogurt for breakfast, and by shopping for lots of meats, seafood, veggies and salad greens for lunch and dinner. I also whip up a big batch of mustard vinaigrette with avocado or olive oil, which goes great on everything from salad to pork tenderloin, and we’ve begun experimenting with spice blends, like berbere, tandoor masala and herbes de Provence to keep things interesting.

                Going out to eat can be a challenge, but it’s surprisingly easy to find keto-friendly foods at restaurants if you know what to avoid. Non-breaded Buffalo wings are (mercifully) very low-carb, and just about every restaurant serves a burger (which can go bunless), steak and chicken or fish of some sort. It was also nice to learn that distilled spirits are essentially carb-free, which means that mixed drinks like vodka soda get the thumbs-up, as do hard seltzers like Truly and White Claw (which contain on average just 2 carbs per can). Wine is also surprisingly low in carbs; most only contain 2 or 3 per glass.

                The Holidays are bound to be difficult for dieters, and Thanksgiving was no exception. The impending carb-heavy traditional meal hung over our heads as we started the diet, but with some advance planning, the holiday proved to not be nearly as challenging as it could have been. We got in touch with the host a couple weeks in advance and let them know the situation (just as anyone with any dietary restrictions should do), and so in lieu of mashed potatoes and stuffing, we loaded our plates with turkey, roasted Brussels sprouts with bacon, prosciutto-wrapped asparagus, roasted curry-spiced cauliflower and a tricolor salad with toasted pecans and goat cheese. Instead of gravy, we topped the turkey with some reserved pan juices from the roasting. Doesn’t sound so bad, does it?

                Since starting the diet, we’ve definitely noticed some changes. Not only have we both lost a significant amount of weight and inches, we’re both sleeping deeper and are generally more alert. And because our bodies are fueled by fat instead of carbs, we’re no longer experiencing the dreaded “carb crash” at work.

                Obviously, the keto diet isn’t for everybody, and I’m not claiming to be an expert on all of its ins and outs. It’s more of a lifestyle than a diet, which means that if we go back to eating as many carbs as we used to, we’ll begin metabolizing glucose for energy instead of fat again and we’ll most likely gain all the weight back. And we know that once we get to our ideal weight, maintaining it will be another challenge unto itself. But we’re taking it one day at a time, learning as we go, and knowing that if we can make it through the Holidays, we can make it through anything.

                Dan Myers is Deputy Editor at The Daily Meal. You can follow him on Instagram @sirmyers.

                The Fresh Market partners with brand incubator – Supermarket News

                To keep its product mix on the cutting edge and attuned to customers’ changing tastes, The Fresh Market has teamed up with New York-based venture studio 25madison to help identify and showcase innovative food and beverage offerings.

                The Fresh Market said the partnership, announced this week, comes as it watches for food trends not just for next year but also into 2021. The Greensboro, N.C.-based natural and organic grocer noted that 25madison will help it stay “on the pulse” of early-stage consumer companies and brands that could disrupt or create market trends.

                “Our mission is to inspire our guests to make everyday eating extraordinary, and to uphold this, we have extremely high standards for the products or brands that ultimately make it into our store,” according to Dwight Richmond, director of center store merchandising at The Fresh Market, which has 159 stores in 22 states.

                Because The Fresh Market’s specialty food curators procure products months ahead of when consumers see the items on shelves, they must stay ahead of the curve on what customers will be shopping for well in advance, the retailer said. In making their buying decisions, curators need to know about what’s trending at restaurants, innovative cuisine, health and wellness trends, growing practices, ingredient quality and traceability.

                Once products or categories of interest are identified, The Fresh Market said its merchandisers then hold “cuttings” of various brands or suppliers to determine the best-tasting, highest quality items in those segments.

                “Some examples of new products that were big hits in 2019, based on trends, were Beyond Burgers and Caulipower Pizza (plant-based), Haku Shoyu and Fillos Sofritos Beans (authentically ethnic), and a host of functional beverages, like kombucha and keto protein drinks,” Richmond said.

                As a business incubator, 25madison will work with The Fresh Market to flag up-and-coming food and beverage players and invest in these early-stage businesses.

                “We are excited to partner with The Fresh Market to help identify, build and invest in disruptive businesses,” Steven Price, CEO of 25madison, said in a statement. “By teaming up with The Fresh Market, we can create a competitive edge for our companies, leveraging unique consumer insights and distribution in 159 stores. This strategic partnership will help The Fresh Market’s customers discover and shop for new and innovative brands.”

                Looking ahead to 2020, The Fresh Market predicted that top food trends will include products limiting sugar intake (such as SmartSweets, a candy line that’s low-sugar and has no artificial sweeteners); seed-based foods (such as Three Trees Black Sesame Nut & Seed Milk, Base Culture Nut & Seed bread and La Tourangelle tahini dressing); more plant-based options (such as RightRice, which blends lentils, peas, chickpeas and rice for added protein and fiber but reduced carbs); and Functional beverages “sans alcohol” (such as H2OPS, a sparkling hop water brewed like a craft beer, and Napa Hills Vineyard Enriched Waters, which provides delivers the antioxidant benefits of a glass of red wine without the calories, sugar or alcohol).

                Customers, too, will continue to seek products with more transparency and sustainability, The Fresh Market said. For example, the chain added products from EPIC Provisions, which offers sustainably sourced 100% grass-fed meat bars, animal cooking fats and snacks. The grocer also went to all cage-free eggs in 2019 and expanded its 100% grass-fed dairy offerings. And in the area of food waste reduction, The Fresh Market said its store-prepared Market Meal Kits contain two portioned, easy-to-cook servings, resulting in no food or ingredient waste.

                “We are entering a phase where consumers want to understand the full life-cycle of a food product, from where and how it was grown, why it is better nutritionally and better for the environment,” Richmond added.