[email protected]: Pandemic shopping habits set to persist | Yogurt brands reflect US food trends – New Hope Network

Consumer goods giants expect that changes to shopping habits due to the current pandemic will become permanent after stay-at-home mandates have subsided, and they are adapting their marketing and formulation strategies accordingly. These new changes include a widespread shift to online shopping, being conscious of cost and an increased interest in health and wellness-related products. Read more at CNN

Yogurt in the U.S. has gone from a sugary snack marketed to kids to a high-protein, artisanal option suitable for everyone from keto adherents to vegans. But what’s next for the category? While some experts are betting on cold brew-infused yogurt’s rise in popularity, others say that nondairy yogurt made with synthetic proteins (AKA the dairy equivalent of the Impossible Burger) will be a big hit with American consumers. Read more at Vox

A once-small startup called Apeel Sciences aims to reduce food waste by keeping food fresh for longer periods of time on store shelves; its technology will also help phase out single-use plastic for these items. The company recently announced $250 million in financing from backers including Oprah Winfrey, and will use this capital to expand its operations and work with big farming companies and growers in Africa, Central America and South America. Read more at Tech Crunch

Instacart workers have noted that the company’s sick pay policy with regard to COVID-19 cases is basically inaccessible. While full-time employees working in grocery stores have at least been receiving hazard pay throughout this crisis, the nation’s gig workers are receiving piecemeal and unpredictable promotions from Instacart and other similar businesses. Read more at The Verge

Private-label brands are expected to gain market share as consumers look for ways to cut down on their food bills. This, in turn, will help retailers offset the higher costs of operating amid the pandemic with many store workers still receiving hazard pay and extra sanitization procedures in place. Read more at The Wall Street Journal…